She was proud of me despite finding the obsession with sex rather embarrassing

Dedication

I dedicate this thesis to my father, Dr Jack Martin Kirkman, MB, BS (1918-1994). He was an adventurer and autodidact who learnt to drive in a T-Model Ford and to fly in a Tiger Moth, later flying Spitfires as a fighter pilot. He enrolled in medicine as a mature age student and was valued and respected as a general practitioner. With his adventurous spirit, interest in technology, support for social justice, and pursuit of lifelong learning Jack has been an inspiration and role model.

Acknowledgements

Relationships are complicated and I have some complicated relationships with the people acknowledged here. I first met Christopher Fox when I visited him in his office to ask if he was interested in supervising my candidature. Supervision has been complicated over the five years of candidature yet Chris has been a constant source of support and influence, even during the middle period when he was not an official supervisor. When I needed someone Chris came back on board as an honorary associate supervisor demonstrating dedication and belief in the topic—and me. Thank you; you rock. Thank you to Virginia Dickson-Swift who took on the role of principal supervisor and cheerfully assisted in steering me through to the end with prompt feedback, practical working structures and useful conversations. I appreciate that Amanda Kenny accepted me as a candidate and later connected me with Cindy Masaro, which led to a visit to Canada. Rob Townsend briefly stepped in as supervisor. I am very grateful for the participants who gave their time, stories and insights; and without whom this research would not exist.

Actual and virtual communities have made a huge contribution to my learning and ultimate success in the PhD process. The Health Sciences post-grad lab at La Trobe Bendigo has gone through a few locations and different populations. My initial companion in the dungeon lab was Karen Marshall whose friendship and intelligence was vital for a number of reasons. One of her excellent skills was to listen intently and have useful contributions to make when my ideas were unfocussed, managing to find the point I was struggling to express. In the latest iteration of the post-grad lab (not a dungeon; it has great views of sky) the collegiality and sense of community has been an example of how such things should be. Charon Freebody, Elena Wilson and Diana Guzys gave friendship and willingness to participate in discussions. Twitter has been like an associate supervisor and through the discussions, links to resources, and community culture of #phdchat I have had access to a 24/7 source of support and up-to-date ideas. The #sexgeekdom community, online and in person, has been a source of friendship, current research and fun times. Daniel Reeders has been a great sounding board and source of up-to-date information on matters HIV and STI, theory, and health promotion. Mark Tolley kept me functioning with therapeutic massage and simultaneous thoughtful insights. Caitlin Whiteman tested her new editing skills and did a brilliant and speedy job of editing the manuscript, teaching me new things as she went.

Cindy Masaro generously invited a complete stranger to stay for a month, and shared ideas, support and encouragement, in Canada and via Skype. Joy Johnson gave time, wisdom and generosity in allowing me to visit the Institute for Gender and Health at the University of British Columbia and provided supervision while I was there in August 2012.

My family has been encouraging, supportive and shown belief in me and my work. I am sad that my mother, Yvonne Kirkman, died before the thesis was finished; she was proud of me despite finding the obsession with sex rather embarrassing.

Huge thanks, love and appreciation go to Jim Ettles who manages a very complicated relationship with grace and generosity.

Contributor: Linda Kirkman

Source: Kirkman, L (2015) Doing relationships differently: rural baby boomers negotiate friends-with-benefits relationships, PhD, La Trobe University Melbourne

Advertisements

It is the journey that I cherish, more than the destination

My journey of learning would not be as enriching as it is, if not for the following:

Almighty God, in whom I hope and from whom I draw my strength,  

My family, who have been very supportive,

Dr. Teresita Perez, for her time, unwaivering faith, love and sharing life with me and my blockmates ;), 

Mrs. Unson, for her patience and comforting presence,

Dr. Emilyn Espiritu, for her valuable inputs, inspiration and encouragement,

Dr. Emmanuel Anglo, for helping in the statistical aspects of the study and the inspiration to do more,

The Environmental Science Faculty, for being an inspiration for me to aspire for knowledge on different topics related to the environment,

Kuya Bert, Kuya Doy and Ate Weng, for their time and effort that has helped us in many ways,

Mang Pando, Tatay Edwin, Nanay Gemma and the community of San Buenaventura, Palacpacquen, San Pablo Laguna, for their hospitality and assitance in acquiring tulya,

Sir Ian Ken Dimzon of the NCIC, who helped us perform AAS, for his patience and kindness,

Sir Edsel Ramirez of the University of the Philippines Institute of Biology, for sharing his knowledge and expertise, 

Kuya Tatot, for the reminding me that nobody said it would be easy, but it would be worth it and that it’s not yet the end if its not a happy ending,

The Ateneo Student Trainers (most especially the Super Six) and theAteneo College Ministry Group who always understood the demands of being a student over being an org member,

The Bukas Palad Music Ministry, for the sense of community and belonging rooted in Christ and in music,

My Blockmates, with whom I have shared almost my entire college life with,

Most especially to Emee, Niko, Mamon, Jules, Benj, Joan, Beng, Pao, KDand coursemates Camille and Earl for the presence, laughter, chismis and love when we are in (the) lab :).

It is the journey that I cherish, more than the destination.

Contributor: @findingjemo

Source: Corbicula manilensis as a Potential Bio-indicator of Sublethal Cadmium Levels in Aquatic Environments

…who believed in me and my ability and encouraged me to be the best that I could be

This is one of the hardest parts of my thesis to write as there are so many people I need to thank. I shall start by getting the money issue out of the way first. This research was funded in part by my parents and also through an ESRC/NERC studentship (PTA-036-2005-00005). I was also lucky enough to obtain grants from the Central London Research Fund and the KCL SSSPP small grants fund for the construction of my research web-site. I thank my supervisors Professor David Demeritt and Dr. Debby Potts for their intellectual guidance, time and patience and Lester Jones for drawing the maps included within this thesis. I wish to thank all those who participated in my research, I am extremely grateful to you all for your time. I would like to pay special thanks to Dr. David Duthie from UNEP for opening up a number of doors for me within the world of biosafety as well as Alex Owuso-Biney from UNEP and John Komen from PBS.

A few years back the teacher training agency ran an ad campaign entitled everyone remembers a good teacher. With that in mind I dedicate this thesis to Mrs Gill Marels, the person responsible for my love of Geography and who believed in me and my ability and encouraged me to be the best that I could be, thank you. I feel at this point it is essential for me to also pay special thanks to Dr Allan Potts and Dr Julian Saurin from Sussex University for their support, encouragement and persuasive reference writing.

I must also thank my friends for being there and supporting me with friendly advice, cups of tea and random conversations about what is wrong with the world particularly, Dr. Lowell Woodcock who has been a great friend, sounding board and general finder of random literature since day one.  Thanks also go to Dr. James Fraser for returning from Columbia at just the right time to help me put my thesis together. To Leanne Brazzell for getting me out of the house occasionally and making sure i ate properly and Clare Rogers and Jo Dickinson for their continued support and friendship over the years, not forgetting their ability to find the correct document the first time you asked whilst always smiling.  My dancing buddies Celeste Korfker, Dr. Rachel Miller and Saskia de Jong as well as my fabulous dance teachers, who should be showered with praise for what they have done for my self-confidence; Hanna Haarala, Karen Hardy and Erin Boag. Other people know them as ‘Strictly pros’ i am lucky enough to class them as my friends.

My final thanks are reserved for my parents, Ann and Howard Quinnell and my family who have been a continual source of support both financial and emotional, strength and motivation and for that I am forever grateful.

Contributor: @sarahthesheepu
Source: Quinnell, S-L (2010) Building Capacity for Biosafety in Africa: Networks of Science, Aid & Development in MEA Implementation, PhD, Department of Geography – King’s College London

I am thankful to my loving wife Esther for her patience and encouragement

First of all, I’d like to thank my friends and family for their support throughout this writing process and my studies as a whole. Most notably, I am thankful to my loving wife Esther for her patience and encouragement. Also, my thanks go out to my supervisor and colleagues. To professor O’Callaghan, for finding the time to supervise me, for his support and his valuable feedback. I’d like to thank Jeroen de Jong of Erasmus University for proof-reading early versions of this work, for his contributions to the survey, for frequently providing advice and for being a great mentor in general. I’d like to thank Eric von Hippel for his friendly encouragement and inspirational guidance. Moreover, his seminal work in user innovation and open source communities provides a critical foundation for this thesis.

During my research, many people have provided important insights, put me into contact with the right people, or otherwise have enabled me to do this work. I whole-heartedly thank the whole RepRap and related communities, of which many have taken the time to provide information through the survey and in many other ways. I’d like to thank the many people that have provided encouragement and welcomed me to their homes, hackerspaces and labs. In particular I’d like to thank Benjamin “Mako” Hill, Zach “Hoeken” Smith, Bre Pettis, Chris Palmer, Rhys Jones, Adrian Bowyer.

Several conferences where I had the privilege to speak were the fertile soil for discussions and development of ideas that are now incorporated in this work. Many thanks to the organizers for making that happen, thanks to Hay Kranen, Thomas Madsen-Mygdal, Bas van Abel, Phoebe Moore, Michel Bauwens, George Kuk, Pedro Custodio, Carla Koen, Xander van Mechelen, Neil Gershenfeld and many others. To Siert Wijnia, for being a good friend and companion to the several conferences. To Martijn Elserman, for involving me in yet another adventure in open source 3D printing.

Finally, I’d like to thank the interviewees and others who have likewise contributed to this work, in no particular order, Marius Karthaus, Pieter de Bruijn, Aike de Jongste, Serge Broekhuizen, Gerald Barnett, Krista Polle, Kees Seldenrijk, George Kuk, Pia Weiss, Kerstin Balka, Marcin Jakubowski and Eric Hunting.

Additional thanks go out to Eric von Hippel and the MIT Sloan School of Management for subsidizing trips to New York City and MIT, Cambridge allowing me to conduct key interviews for my research and to EIM Business and Policy Research for providing additional funding that allowed me to do this work.

Contributor: @ErikDeBruijn Erik’s blog is here
Source: de Bruijn, E (2010) On the viability of the open source development model for the design of physical objects: Lessons learned from the RepRap project, MSc, University of Tilburg, The Netherlands

Without their generosity of time and spirit this work would not have been possible

I would like to give thanks to all those people that made up the Subject Matter Expert Panel; Mr Pradeep Anand, Dr Matthew Best, Mr Duncan Cripps, Dr Andrew Dickenson, Dr Elizabeth Gruber, Dr Rebecca Harling, Mr Craige Holdstock, Dr Melanie Huddart, Dr Suzy Hope, Mrs Joanna Lawrence, Mr Ben Lindsey, Dr Rob Marshall, Mrs Susie Matthews, Mr Christian Mills, Dr Elizabeth Mumford, Mr Simon Mynes, Mrs Johanna Skewes, Dr Oliver Sykes, Mr Mike Wilcock, Dr Simon Williams, and Dr John Bradford. Without their generosity of time and spirit this work would not have been possible. Special thanks go to Dr Steve Shaw for his statistical advice and guidance.

I would also like to thank John for his time, patience, humour and support, which has enabled me to keep focused but also to see the bigger picture.

Contributor: @samharding
Source: Design and Validation of assessment tools for use with Junior Doctors in Applying Clinical Pharmacology

Because of you, all this was made possible

To use the terminology from the service blueprint (after all, research is a kind of public service) ─ I may be the one interacting with you, the reader, but I would not be able to do it without all the people in the back office, be they colleagues, friends or professional acquaintances. A warm thank you to…
… my advisors; Stefan Holmlid for always being open to discuss new ideas and concepts and encouraging me to find my way in the research landscape. The plentiful short two-minute-discussions are invaluable! Arne Jönsson, for your no-bullshit attitude and providing a different angle so that I do not get caught up in the service design-bubble. Björn Alm, for many fruitful discussions and reflections, especially when it comes to the methodology.
… my informants. Without the willingness to share their ways of working and produced visualisations, this thesis could not have been. I’ve been fortunate enough to have 21 practicing service designers from 15 companies in seven countries to sharing their time and efforts with me.
… the IxS research group (Eva L, Eva R, Johan B, Johan Å, Matti and Stefan) for good discussions and an open climate. There is always someone to strike up a conversation on any given design-related topic or just chit-chat with for five minutes. And of course the weekly meetings with cake!
… my fellow PhD students (past and present) and others who join in on the so well needed coffee breaks; Amy, Anna, Arne, Jody, Johan, Jonas, Lars, Maria, Magnus, Sanna and Sara. I think it’s time for the next PhD pub soon though…
… everyone who has helped in one way or another in making this thesis take the shape it is, be it modelling (Anna), photographing (Jonas), proof reading (dad), sharing typographic formatting (Sanna) or giving feedback on the presentation of my ideas in the thesis (Stefan, Björn, Arne and Johan). And a special thank you the tweeters who have responded to my thesis-related tweets, be it questions about nuances in the use of English words or encouraging pads on the virtual back.
… Diana, Pacenti & Tassi for letting me re-print their model in the thesis.
… all my friends who make life as good as it is.
… my parents. Because of you, all this was made possible. You always believe in me and encourage me to find my own path through life, and support me along the path.


Contributor: @segelstrom
Source: Segelström, F (2010) Visualisations in Service Design Licentiate of Philosophy – Linköping University