She was proud of me despite finding the obsession with sex rather embarrassing

Dedication

I dedicate this thesis to my father, Dr Jack Martin Kirkman, MB, BS (1918-1994). He was an adventurer and autodidact who learnt to drive in a T-Model Ford and to fly in a Tiger Moth, later flying Spitfires as a fighter pilot. He enrolled in medicine as a mature age student and was valued and respected as a general practitioner. With his adventurous spirit, interest in technology, support for social justice, and pursuit of lifelong learning Jack has been an inspiration and role model.

Acknowledgements

Relationships are complicated and I have some complicated relationships with the people acknowledged here. I first met Christopher Fox when I visited him in his office to ask if he was interested in supervising my candidature. Supervision has been complicated over the five years of candidature yet Chris has been a constant source of support and influence, even during the middle period when he was not an official supervisor. When I needed someone Chris came back on board as an honorary associate supervisor demonstrating dedication and belief in the topic—and me. Thank you; you rock. Thank you to Virginia Dickson-Swift who took on the role of principal supervisor and cheerfully assisted in steering me through to the end with prompt feedback, practical working structures and useful conversations. I appreciate that Amanda Kenny accepted me as a candidate and later connected me with Cindy Masaro, which led to a visit to Canada. Rob Townsend briefly stepped in as supervisor. I am very grateful for the participants who gave their time, stories and insights; and without whom this research would not exist.

Actual and virtual communities have made a huge contribution to my learning and ultimate success in the PhD process. The Health Sciences post-grad lab at La Trobe Bendigo has gone through a few locations and different populations. My initial companion in the dungeon lab was Karen Marshall whose friendship and intelligence was vital for a number of reasons. One of her excellent skills was to listen intently and have useful contributions to make when my ideas were unfocussed, managing to find the point I was struggling to express. In the latest iteration of the post-grad lab (not a dungeon; it has great views of sky) the collegiality and sense of community has been an example of how such things should be. Charon Freebody, Elena Wilson and Diana Guzys gave friendship and willingness to participate in discussions. Twitter has been like an associate supervisor and through the discussions, links to resources, and community culture of #phdchat I have had access to a 24/7 source of support and up-to-date ideas. The #sexgeekdom community, online and in person, has been a source of friendship, current research and fun times. Daniel Reeders has been a great sounding board and source of up-to-date information on matters HIV and STI, theory, and health promotion. Mark Tolley kept me functioning with therapeutic massage and simultaneous thoughtful insights. Caitlin Whiteman tested her new editing skills and did a brilliant and speedy job of editing the manuscript, teaching me new things as she went.

Cindy Masaro generously invited a complete stranger to stay for a month, and shared ideas, support and encouragement, in Canada and via Skype. Joy Johnson gave time, wisdom and generosity in allowing me to visit the Institute for Gender and Health at the University of British Columbia and provided supervision while I was there in August 2012.

My family has been encouraging, supportive and shown belief in me and my work. I am sad that my mother, Yvonne Kirkman, died before the thesis was finished; she was proud of me despite finding the obsession with sex rather embarrassing.

Huge thanks, love and appreciation go to Jim Ettles who manages a very complicated relationship with grace and generosity.

Contributor: Linda Kirkman

Source: Kirkman, L (2015) Doing relationships differently: rural baby boomers negotiate friends-with-benefits relationships, PhD, La Trobe University Melbourne

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Train journeys at ungodly hours

The Golden Age is before us, not behind us

Sallust 

First of all, a huge “thank you” to my supervisor for these past, nearly four, years, Professor David Collison, for his unflagging support and advice of one sort and another. Hopefully all those train journeys at ungodly hours paid off.

Also, thanks to Mark Whiteley, one of the nicest and most helpful people imaginable, who supervised my 3rd-year and MChem projects, for setting me off on further roads, and to both Emma and Hannah for their good influence then and since.

To Professors Eric McInnes and Richard Winpenny for advice and inspiration. Sorry this took so long Richard, it wasn’t deliberate, honest!

To Iain May for what seems to have been a career defining chat a long, long time ago…

In the Magnets Group and beyond, thanks to Floriana Tuna for her expertise with EPR and SQUID. To Stephen Sproules for help with EPR and being so knowledgeable about almost everything, danke sehr. Thanks to Asad for everything over the past eight (help!) years. Won’t forget seeing England keep The Ashes at Old Trafford, rain and all. To Eufemio, Panama’s greatest scientist! One day, maybe, I’ll get there… Thanks to Luke and Tom for being magnets-heroes to worship. To all those past and present members who’ve offered up some help or advice, you’re all wonderful. A special thanks to those who had to endure my tortuous writing up and for their (unwitting or otherwise) support through it, especially James, Sam and Claire.

For the newer Magnets Group members at Manchester and those venturing abroad (Scotland), best wishes! Keep your enthusiasm if possible. And good luck to all MChem students who passed through my orbit. I noticed not many of you stuck with chemistry though… To the latest project students Tom (Prodigy) and Hatty, I hope you get what you want!

Even more recently I made the geographically short move to the National EPR Service. I’m so grateful to know the wonderful people Chloe, Simon and Dan who haunt the Alan Turing Building. Thanks for keeping me at least slightly sane whilst figuring things out over there!

To my brothers John and Ben: Hurrah, made it this far! Thanks for all the things that have made this more bearable. Maybe all those weird side-projects can get done now… rockets, weather balloons, rail-guns, prog-rock albums??? So much to catch up with…

Lastly, thanks to my parents for all the moral support and the amazing chances they’ve given me over the years (not to mention living in the same house as me and John for the past few years in particular).

Contributor: Joseph Sharples

Source: Sharples, J (2013) Cooling Rapidly and Relaxing Slowly with 4f Ions, PhD, University of Manchester

It is as close to living the life of a monk as you can get, without actually setting foot in a monastery

Thanks are due to the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council for the funding that made this research possible. By extension I’d like to offer my thanks to all the staff of the Department of Mathematics & Statistics at the University of Surrey.

My supervisor, Dr Peter Hydon, is a remarkable, thoughtful and kind man to whom I would like to offer my sincerest gratitude for inspiration in fields well beyond that of mathematics.

Of course, my parents have offered tremendous support and encouragement, as have Jessie and her family, and my thanks naturally go to them all.

Finally, for any postgraduate student that happens upon these acknowledgements, may I assure you of the truth of a fellow student’s works on the practise of research – that it is as close to living the life of a monk as you can get, without actually setting foot in a monastery. I should also point that it’s a lot of fun, too.

Contributor: @rich_w

Source: Watts, R (2005) Determining the symmetries of initial-value problems, MPhil, University of Surrey

The biggest of all the giants is my Dad

Standing on the shoulders of giants…

Back in 2009, I remember discussing my initial attempt at a literature review with Sal Craig when he asked me, ‘Who are your giants? Whose shoulders are you going to stand on?’. To paraphrase Newton if I have seen any further, it is by standing on the shoulders of my giants, of whom there are several. To them all, I am extremely grateful to for your help, support and encouragement over the last four years.

To my industrial giants Buro Happold, thank you for the generous sponsorship. Thank you to all those I worked with over the last four years throughout my engineering doctorate (EngD). To Lindsey, Christine and Celia for having the patience to read my work. Special thanks have to go Sal and Neil for their advice in the earlier years of the research. Thanks to Zack for all he taught me while completing his own EngD. Mark, thank you for helping me through all the EngD modules and accompanying me on this journey. And to Jonathan, a huge thank you for all the proof reading, cups of tea and the friendship extended to me since the day I started back in 2008.

In the academic world I wish to thank the ESPRC for funding the EngD programme, which I was fortunate to be a part of. Thank you to Eleanor Van Den Heuvel and Linda Paul at Brunel University for helping me coordinate the participants and usability studies. I’d also like to thank all of the study participants who gave up their time to help me, without whom this research would not have been possible.

Within the school of Engineering and Design, Brunel University, I’d like to thank Dr Hua Dong for her invaluable advice throughout the doctorate. Dr Mark Young thank you for the statistical help and advice on study design. Dan Lockton, thank you for pointing me in the right direction and for continuing to encourage me throughout. Your work has been an inspiration as to what research work can achieve. Professor David Harrison, thank you for providing me with the opportunity to undertake the EngD in the first place and for your continued support and reassurance over the years.

The biggest of all the giants is my Dad, who I cannot thank enough for the opportunities he has given me, the constant encouragement he provides and for always being there for me. I am so fortunate to have a champion like you, who is supportive and motivating in equal measures. Alongside my Dad there is Catherine, my sister Emma and the rest of my family in South Africa, thank you for being in my life.

To my friends Julia, Anna, Kat, Anna, and Sarah – thank you for your continued friendship, support, hugs, skype chats, laughs and cups of tea along the way. David, thank you for taking the time to proof read this thesis, your input was invaluable. Thank you Ferg, for all the conversations, philosophical debates and inspirational conversations over coffee and cake. I am truly lucky to count you amongst my friends. And Tim, thank you for all the support and encouragement you give me, and the patience and unwavering faith you have in me. You believe in me even when I don’t believe in myself. For that I am eternally grateful. Love, always.

I would like to dedicate this thesis to the memory of my mother, Jenny Combe (1948-1994), who is a constant source of inspiration. I hope she would have been proud.

Contributor: @niccombe

Source: EngD, Brunel University, 2012

 

Thank you for all the face rubs

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

It’s amazing to sit and think how many people over the past three and a half years, or one thousand, two hundred and sixteen days to be more precise, have contributed to, or supported my own motivation to complete this MPhil, and it’s even more difficult to attempt to acknowledge all those who have contributed to this process in other ways over that time, or even before it started. However,

THROUGHOUT

To Mum and Dad, I’m never totally sure that you got it (yet), and maybe that’s unfair, but it didn’t stop you always putting up with my rants about it, or stop you being understanding of the knock on impact that this work has had on everything else over the past three and a bit years, so thank you for that. I suppose without the education and upbringing you both have given me none of this would have even got started. Boodle, I knew somewhere deep down that despite being the younger sister and despite me having a head start on you in life you were going to beat me to these letters after my name! You did of course! Thank you for all your support along the way and glad we’ve both got there now! I’d also like to say a massive thank you to Steve and Jill Blount (old enough to be my parents…I mean, honorary parents!) for your support on numerous weekends in the early days of this process. If it wasn’t for you both back in the winter of 2003/2004, introducing me to coffee and Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance and teaching me to ski properly, I don’t think my brain would have ever started working in the way that it has since. You (and everyone else) can be the judge as to whether on balance that’s been a good thing, but seriously you helped me motivate myself to something better in so many ways back then and you continue to be an inspiration to me – thank you!

THE TWITTERSPHERE (NOVEMBER, 2008 – PRESENT)

It’s entirely fair to say that this thesis wouldn’t exist without Twitter so Biz, Jack and Evan, thanks. It is of course ironic that as a result of a medium that limits messages to 140 characters, the world is now bequeathed with this 524,884+ character, 77,000 word monstrosity, but it is less about the length of those tweets and more about the people and ideas with whom and with which I was able to connect throughout this process for which I’m truly grateful. Particularly to the following individuals, in no particular order, @georgejulian, @segelstrom, @rufflemuffin, @redjotter, @designthinkers, @laura_grant@lixindex, @mrstickdorn, @choosenick@meanestindian, @syamant@satumiettinen@designersaccord@mattcurrienz, @Hellibop@jamin, @ylvalindberg, @iterations, (Mr!) @jakoblies, @ninalysbakken@adamstjohn, @wimrampen, @grahamhill, @apolaine, @danlockton, @niccombe, @shlmld@ninaksimon, @ideum and countless others. It does unfortunately feel, to quote The Corries, that “those days are passed now, and in the past they must remain”. But they were great whilst they lasted and we are all still connected so, it might not feel like 2009 again, but who knows what could happen in future… I’d also like to give a special nod at this point to Hugh Dubberly without whose work, this thesis might not exist, or, without which this thesis would most definitely have taken on a very different, and far less valuable form. I put this here, as without Twitter I’m fairly sure I might never have discovered Dubberly’s work. #legend #thankyou.

In addition to their mention above, I’d also like to take the time to say a massive thanks to Marc Stickdorn and Jakob Schneider for their work on This is Service Design Thinking and for enabling me to be part of that project and contribute to it. It has been massively reassuring in the latter stages of this process to know that at least a couple of people believed in my work on a professional basis so thank you both gentlemen, the subsequent success of TISDT is a testament to you both and all your hard work. I’d also like to thank Renato Troncon, whom I got to know better as part of that process, for affirming my conviction of the relationship and the importance of philosophy within design, and of the importance of a philosophy of design, particularly when no one else seemed to take this seriously – thank you!

BRUNEL UNIVERSITY (SEPTEMBER 2008 – FEBRUARY 2010)

Obviously, a big nod needs to go to Dr Mark Young at Brunel University in his role as supervisor of this MPhil and also in his role as chief instigator of the Ergonomics Real Design Exhibition project, cheers Mark! I’d also like to thank the rest of the Ergonomics Real Design Project team for their work and differing contributions and perspectives, all of which have in numerous positive ways supported and challenged this work, and the thinking and contribution of this thesis. Particularly I’d like to thank Dr Laura Grant and Dr Bella Williams from Laura Grant Associates for their help and support with the evaluation aspects of the project, and as they are referenced here, within this thesis as well. I’d also like to thank Colin Johnson from the EPSRC for his support and enthusiasm for the Ergonomics Real Design Project, Margaret Cabbage at the Design Museum for being such a pragmatist and making it all happen and Henrik at A2/SW/HK and Michael Marriott for bringing the yellow and black, co-created, systems-thinking, all other things antithetical to the Design Museum vision to life, and for providing it with the veneer of the London design establishment it evidently required to be as successful as it was, and which the rest of us quite evidently lacked, (and still do)! Also at The Design Museum, Dejan Sudjic and Gemma Curtin for fuelling my anti-motivation and conviction in the importance and relevance of a democratic approach to design, one day I hope you will see more clearly the participatory perspective, just as each day since I understand more clearly the validity of your own ‘legislating view’, in all sincerity your determination and vision for what is right for your current audience only greater forced me to develop my own idea of what, as a designer, my view and relationship with my users should be.

Also at Brunel, I’d like to thank Dr Hua Dong for her support as my second supervisor and for her advice throughout this process, your work ethic and ambition Hua is an inspiration and a case study in motivation itself! Farnaz, for being the first person I showed the Motivational Design Framework to and for not laughing me out of the room, your support and ideas in so may ways in those early stages was invaluable – kheili mamnoon! To the rest of the Inclusive Design Research Group at Brunel University and to Dr Marco Ajovalasit in the Human Centred Design Institute for allowing me to present in the HCDI Seminars in the early stages of this work, thank you.

Also at Brunel I’d like to acknowledge the huge role Dan Lockton and his PhD work on Architectures of Control / Design for Behaviour played in motivating my own belief in a number of things, 1) that it was possible for a designer or a design researcher to take on the concept of behaviour (or motivated behaviour) and for that to be worthwhile, 2) that it was possible for someone at Brunel to do postgraduate research of value and interest to the rest of the design community and 3) that it was a good idea to blog about some of that work. Seriously Dan, without you I wouldn’t have even got started, or believed it possible. What you achieved with your blog, and the means by which you made your work accessible to others over the course of your PhD says more about Public Engagement with Science and motivation than this thesis will ever manage to theorise or replicate. Thanks buddy.

There are a few other folk from my time at Brunel who I’d like to acknowledge, Graham and Lucy Ormiston, for putting up with me in the first year or so as a flatmate and (probably) lousy friend over that period and since. Perhaps most significantly over this time (Dr!) Nicola Combe for those days at the British Library, coffee, cake and chats that kept me sane through all this madness, a sanity that I’m fairly confident I’ve since lacked – thank you Nixy, you’re wonderful, I miss you and many of the things about those days!

POST-BRUNEL (MARCH 2010 – JANUARY 2012)

There is really only one person, in relation to my MPhil, whom I need to thank post-February 2010, the one person who has really believed in it, and been prepared to let me know that, and put up with me when I haven’t been feeling the love for it. George, words cannot describe your patience and support for a process that, well, frankly has been unbearable for us both over the past couple of years. Writing these words signals one thing however, and that is the fact that the process is over and hopefully what hasn’t killed us has only made us, and our relationship stronger. I can’t say it wouldn’t have been complete without you but what I can emphatically say is that you saved me completely losing my sanity to this, just about, oh, and without you the spelling and referencing would have been considerably worse! Seriously George thank you so much. Having said that there was only one more person that I needed to thank, there is one other, who thinks he is a person – Mogsy – thank you for all the face rubs as part of the process of completing this research and writing this thesis up, your company and occasional typing assistance has helped make things considerably more enjoyable, thank you!

Contributor: @FergusBisset

Source: Bisset, F (2012) An elucidation of the concept of motivation within museum exhibition design; an exploration of how designers can support motivational engagement within design, MPhil, Brunel University

…the discerning input of my brilliant proof readers

I’d like to thank Dave Millard for his support and guidance through the course of this research. His uncanny ability to ask searching, difficult questions has undoubtedly strengthened my critical abilities, not to mention this work. My thanks also extend to Andy Stanford-Clark, whose shrewd input and enthusiasm have kept me on track and engaged.

I’ve had the good fortune to have guidance from many others, notably including my second supervisors Dave de Roure and Mark Weal. I’m grateful to the many study participants who so generously gave up their time, and for the discerning input of my brilliant proof readers. This work was also made possible by IBM’s generous support.

The communities at IBM Hursley and LSL have been welcoming and supportive, while figures such as Faith Lawrence and Max Wilson been role models for conducting doctoral-level research. I continue to draw inspiration from those around me, particularly Wendy Hall and Nate Matias, who achieve great goals with dedication and hard work while supporting the many communities around them.

I’m lucky to have many wonderful people in my life, and I’d like to thank them for their support: amongst people too numerous to list, my thanks extend to Reena, Jane, Don, Thomas, John-Mark, Ruth ‘n’ Tim, Alan, Hugh, Dave and the OGC crowd. Thanks for putting up with me!

Finally, and most of all, my thanks to Alisdair for his unfailing support, which is too extensive to enumerate.

Contributor: @ClareJHooper

Source: EngD, University of Southampton

It is the journey that I cherish, more than the destination

My journey of learning would not be as enriching as it is, if not for the following:

Almighty God, in whom I hope and from whom I draw my strength,  

My family, who have been very supportive,

Dr. Teresita Perez, for her time, unwaivering faith, love and sharing life with me and my blockmates ;), 

Mrs. Unson, for her patience and comforting presence,

Dr. Emilyn Espiritu, for her valuable inputs, inspiration and encouragement,

Dr. Emmanuel Anglo, for helping in the statistical aspects of the study and the inspiration to do more,

The Environmental Science Faculty, for being an inspiration for me to aspire for knowledge on different topics related to the environment,

Kuya Bert, Kuya Doy and Ate Weng, for their time and effort that has helped us in many ways,

Mang Pando, Tatay Edwin, Nanay Gemma and the community of San Buenaventura, Palacpacquen, San Pablo Laguna, for their hospitality and assitance in acquiring tulya,

Sir Ian Ken Dimzon of the NCIC, who helped us perform AAS, for his patience and kindness,

Sir Edsel Ramirez of the University of the Philippines Institute of Biology, for sharing his knowledge and expertise, 

Kuya Tatot, for the reminding me that nobody said it would be easy, but it would be worth it and that it’s not yet the end if its not a happy ending,

The Ateneo Student Trainers (most especially the Super Six) and theAteneo College Ministry Group who always understood the demands of being a student over being an org member,

The Bukas Palad Music Ministry, for the sense of community and belonging rooted in Christ and in music,

My Blockmates, with whom I have shared almost my entire college life with,

Most especially to Emee, Niko, Mamon, Jules, Benj, Joan, Beng, Pao, KDand coursemates Camille and Earl for the presence, laughter, chismis and love when we are in (the) lab :).

It is the journey that I cherish, more than the destination.

Contributor: @findingjemo

Source: Corbicula manilensis as a Potential Bio-indicator of Sublethal Cadmium Levels in Aquatic Environments

A source of inspiration to me all my life

I would like to dedicate this dissertation to my parents who have been a source of inspiration to me all my life. It is only through their support and encouragement that this work has been possible. I would also like to thank Michael Clarke and Charanjit Marwaha for their support throughout the MSc Data Networks and Security course.

Contributor: @dalemorson
Source: Morson, D (2009) Improving network lab environments using virtualisation MSc, University of Birmingham