I am very grateful to all those who have given me their friendship, put up with my odd hours, and provided me with lifts and practical help

My thanks are due first to my Director of Studies, Dr Martin Polley, of the School of Education, University of Southampton (formerly of King Alfred’s College of Higher Education, Winchester), and my Second Supervisor, Professor Joyce Goodman, of University College, Winchester, for their guidance, encouragement and enthusiasm for my project over the years. My thanks are also directed at my Academic Advisor, Dr Terence Rodgers, of Bath Spa University College, for advice and comments on particular aspects of the thesis, and to Professor Roger Richardson, University College, Winchester, for his initial help and supervision of the project. I am grateful to Dr Malcolm Smith, of the University of Wales, Lampeter, and Dr Chris Aldous, of University College, Winchester, for their examining input at the upgrade stage.

University College, Winchester also provided a lively research community and I am grateful to other staff and postgraduates for their support and ideas, in particular Dr Stephanie Spencer for allowing me to practise verbally expounding my ideas. King Alfred’s generously funded the initial three years of study, and has subsequently funded attendance at conferences, giving me further opportunities to present my work and discuss issues with established historians. It also funded participation at workshops, including those concerning the digitisation of historical resources. The library, in particular Miranda Nield-Dumper, patiently ordered many inter-library loans, and the ITCS Department ensured that my computer remained in working order, whilst Ian Short (software developer) and Lynne Frost (née Biltcliffe) (IT Trainer) also provided help with the initial development of the project database. I am exceptionally grateful to Dr James Heather, University of Surrey at Guildford, who has spent many hours developing the project database to my requirements, even whilst completing his own PhD.

An extensive amount of time has been spent in archives and record offices, and I thank all the staff for the help and advice given, particularly the following: Michael Moody at the Imperial War Museum; Anna Green and Joy Eldridge of the Mass-Observation Archives; Katrina Royall and others at the Victoria & Albert Museum; the Public Record Office; the British Library, in particular The British Library Newspaper Library, Colindale; Churchill Archives Centre, Cambridge; the London Transport Museum; the House of Lords Record Office; the Wellcome Institute and the Women’s Library.

I am also indebted to other libraries that allowed me to use their facilities in the course of my research, in particular Winchester School of Art Library, the Hartley Library, University of Southampton; the Institute for Historical Research; St. Peter’s Library, University of Brighton; Templeman Library, University of Kent at Canterbury, and the library at the University of Sussex. I am very appreciative of University College, Winchester who allowed me to attend the ‘Research Methodology’ module from ‘MA in Regional and Local History and Archaeology’, and Winchester School of Art, who allowed me to attend selected lectures from ‘MA: Art and Ideology in Europe 1917-1968’, both free of charge. I also appreciate the University of Kent at Canterbury, who allowed me to attend selected lectures from their ‘MA in Propaganda, Persuasion and History’. I am very grateful to all those who have written to me, particularly those who completed my questionnaire in 1997 and 1998, from which I received much useful information.

Personally, I would like to thank my family and friends for supporting me throughout the years, financially, practically and with moral support, especially my parents. I am exceptionally grateful to Andrew Frost for providing me with a room at a rate that I could afford to stay in Winchester for a key time. Particular thanks goes to Toby and Nicky Robinson and Justin Wood for providing me with places to stay whilst conducting extensive research in London, and to Dr Justine Cooper, who alongside such practical help, provided beneficial advice arising from her previous experience as a Winchester PhD student. Kate Stephens gave me exceptional moral support, Karen Neal allowed me to practise explaining my thesis, David and Chris Quayle were supportive landlords during the final months of writing, and there are many more whom I could name, including Amanda Henocq and Helen Hobbs, but the list would be absurdly long. I am very grateful to all those who have given me their friendship, put up with my odd hours, and provided me with lifts and practical help.

Contributor: @ww2poster

Source: Lewis, B (2004) The Planning, Design and Reception of British Home Front Propaganda Posters of the Second World War, PhD, University College Winchester

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…to Chris, for not letting me not do it, and for understanding and being wonderful

Dedication

This thesis is dedicated to the memory of my Mum, Pavla Marie Atherton, to whom I never really got to explain much of this, but who approved. She would have been tickled to see me wearing a mortarboard.

Acknowledgements

I would like to thank my supervisors,

Dr Charles Leek (University of Wales, Bangor), Dr Neil Thacker (University of Manchester), and Professor Alan Jackson (University of Manchester)

for their kind help and endless patience, and also for just letting me get on with it. I am particularly indebted to Charles for his helpful suggestions and unfailing geniality.

I would like to express my profound gratitude to Dr Guillaume Thierry (University of Wales, Bangor), for his tireless assistance with the ERP study, which was very much appreciated.

Thanks are also due to the following people, without whose patient technical assistance I would not have been able to complete the work presented here:

Mark Roberts (University of Wales, Bangor) Dr Shane McKie (University of Manchester) Yvon Watson (University of Manchester) Dr Igor Hollander (formerly of the University of Manchester)

I would also like to thank Professor Neil Roberts (University of Liverpool) and Dr Rob Ward (University of Wales, Bangor) for their helpful comments and suggestions for improvements to this thesis.

Last, and most importantly, love and thanks to my parents, Pavla and Graham, for believing I could do it, and to Chris, for not letting me not do it, and for understanding and being wonderful.

Contributor: @finiteattention
Source: Atherton, C (2005) The Neurobiology of Object Constancy, PhD, University of Wales, Bangor

Friends and family for being there when needed and forgiving my absence at other times

I have been able to undertake this Masters in Public Health because of the Welsh Assembly Government’s support for deprived communities in South Wales through the Department of General Practice, Cardiff University. I hope that the experience I have gained from this study will help me to contribute to the reduction of inequalities in health in these areas. I am very appreciative of the opportunities available to develop academic skills afforded by the foresight of those who have sought funding for the programmes I and others are working within.

Shortly after I began working in Wales, Dr. John Watkins introduced me to the Caerphilly Health and Social Needs Survey. I am grateful for our initial discussions and his encouragement to study this area in greater depth.

My supervisor, Dr. David Fone, has been very patient and I am thankful for his guidance whilst I worked on this topic.

I would like to thank friends and family for being there when needed and forgiving my absence at other times. And last but not least, my warmest thanks to Chris for his continual caring and kindness.

Contributor: @amcunningham
Source: Cunningham, A.M. (2004) Social Capital and Smoking. MA in Public Health, Cardiff University