Thank you for making me more than I am

Dedication:

This thesis is dedicated to Jacky Lee 1946 – 2011 who never got to read the final draft. You are the determination in every page.

Acknowledgements

While my name may be alone on the front cover of this thesis, I am by no means its sole contributor. Rather, there are a number of people behind this piece of work who deserve to be both acknowledged and thanked here: kind participants; patient friends (especially Lucy, who regularly brought wine and smiles); committed supervisors; generous research advisory group members; an inspiring mother (who lead me here) and a determined father (my personal proof-reader…); and a fantastically supportive partner.

I am forever indebted to my academic supervisers, Dr Carol Wolkowitz and Dr Karen Throsby, for their enthusiasm, guidance, and unrelenting support throughout this process. They have routinely gone beyond their duties to fire fight my worries, concerns, and anxieties, and have worked to instil great confidence in both myself and my work. In addition, both have generously shared their passion for feminism, and their knowledges of sexualities and the body which are to the great benefit of this thesis.

I would like to thank my partner for his unremitting encouragement. Put simply, I have never met anyone who believes in me more. Thank you for making me more than I am.

Most importantly of all, I show extensive gratitude to all of the people who warmly contributed their stories, histories, and experiences. Without this willingness to share, the research would not have even been possible. In the same vein, I would like to extend great thanks to Research Advisory Group members who offered their time, support and commitment. This piece of research looks very different because of their input, influence and expert knowledge.

Lastly, I thank the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) which provided full funding for this work. 

Contributor: Kirsty Liddiard

SourceLiddiard, K (2012) (S)exploring disability: Intimacies, sexualities and disabilities, PhD, University of Warwick

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Making me realise that I should never let being dyslexic hold me back from what I want to do

This PhD thesis is the culmination of a life-long interest in geology and has turned into as much a labour of love as a scientific study. Numerous people over the years have helped me get here, so there are many people I need to thank. Firstly, I would like to thank my supervisors from Durham University, Richard Davies and Richard Brown for their support, encouragement and advice throughout this project. I would like to thank my supervisors from Statoil UK Ltd, Jenny Morris and Rosie Fletcher for their guidance and assistance, and for giving me valuable insights into the petroleum industry. I would also like to thank my past supervisors, Dougal Jerram and Dorthe Møller Hansen for helping to set up this project. I am very grateful to the Volcanic Margins Research Consortium for providing excellent field trips, a place to discuss my research and access to some of the most knowledgeable people in my field, both in academia and industry. I would especially like to thank Tim Watton, Sam Clark, Bansri Raithatha, Heather Rawcliffe, Catherine Nelson, Clayton Grove, Nick Schofield, Simon Passey, David Brown, Richard Walker and Brian Bell for interesting discussions, both in the class room and down the pub. At the end of my PhD, this thesis was examined by Peter Burgess from Royal Holloway, University of London and Claire Horwell from Durham University. I would like to thank both of them for the many suggestions that improved this manuscript.

I would like to extend my gratitude to Statoil UK for funding this project through the CeREES scholarship program, and for providing much of the seismic reflection data. To David Ellis, Peter Dromgoole, Alex Reid and Adam Pugh for useful discussions and advice throughout my PhD. To DONG Energy UK for providing an internship and for letting me get my hands on industry data without any real expectations. To Mike Smith, Steve Cannon, Catherine Horseman, Alwyn Ross, Rémi Rateau, Giuseppina Pezza and Richard Nice for letting me ask many, many questions about Petrel. To the Rosebank partnership, Chevron, Statoil, OMV and DONG Energy, for permission to use the work undertaken during my internship as part of my PhD thesis. To Chevron, CGG Veritas, Fugro Multi Client Services, PGS, Spectrum ASA and WesternGeco for providing the seismic data under licence from Statoil UK Ltd and DONG Energy UK. To Halliburton for providing the seismic interpretation software through the Landmark Universities software grant program and Schlumberger for providing Petrel under licence to DONG Energy UK.

From Durham University, I am grateful to all the administrative staff for practical support throughout my PhD, including Katie Daniels, Andrea Bailey, Karen Atkinson, Janice Oakes, Paula Elliot and April Furnal. I would also like to thank members of the academic staff for advice and support, including João Trabucho-Alexandre, Jon Gluyas and Chris Greenwell. In addition, I would like to thank Dave Stevenson and Gary Wilkinson for data loading, software and hardware support. I would like to thank my fellow postgraduate students for providing a sense of community and camaraderie, there are too many of you to mention but I would especially like to thank Claire McLeod, Isobel Yeo, Harriet Ridley and Amy Clarke. I would also like to thank Mark Ireland, Steve Richardson, Katie Roberts, Amélie Leduc, Dom Maloney and David Moy for helping me get to grips with my research and the more technical elements of interpreting seismic reflection data. Many thanks to the Durham Volcanology Group for providing interesting discussions and introducing me to other aspects of volcanology. Going back in time, I want to thank my classmates and lecturers from the Geology Department at University of Leicester who helped me to believe in myself, made learning a fun experience and who provided me with a strong foundation in the subject I love. I am also grateful to Paul Starr and Paul Edmunds who taught ‘A’ level geology at Bishop Stopford School, Kettering. You set me on the path I am on now and I have never looked back.

On a more personal note I would like to thank Emily Boon, Karen Bianchi, Kathy Mather and Jo Variava for never letting me doubt myself and for reminding me there is a whole world outside of my PhD. I would especially like to thank Rhian Meara for toblerone martinis, peanut butter M&M’s and for always being there when I needed her. I would also like to thank Helen and Mike Hedley for their support and for always inviting me to take a break and go away with them to play in the snow. I am eternally gratefully to my family, my parents Helen and Michael, my siblings Tom and Fiona, my Grandmother, the American and Canadian contingents and those family members more recently rediscovered. Thank you for encouraging me, supporting me and making me realise that I should never let being dyslexic hold me back from what I want to do. This PhD is a testament to your faith in me, I hope I have made you proud. Finally I would like to thank my long suffering other half Ben Hedley. Words cannot express my gratitude for everything you have done. Thank you for accompanying me on this adventure, I look forward to our next one!!

Contributor: Kirstie Wright

Source: Wright, K (2013) Seismic Stratigraphy and Geomorphology of Palaeocene Volcanic Rocks, Faroe-Shetland Basin, PhD, Durham University

Thank you for being my muse, editor, proofreader, and sounding board

Carrying out the requisite work and then writing this thesis was, undoubtably, the most arduous task I have undertaken. However, one of the joys of having completed the thesis is looking back at everyone who has helped me over the past three, seven, and twenty-five years.

I would like to begin by thanking my three supervisors: Professors Sasha Movchan, Ian Jones, and Natasha Movchan. It is an often used cliché, but in this case it is no overstatement to say that without the consistent guidance, tutelage, support, unparalleled knowledge, and encouragement of my three supervisors, this thesis would never have existed. In particular, I would like to thank Natasha who went above and beyond to read every line of the manuscript in meticulous detail. I must say a special thank you to Sasha and Ian who, during my third year as an undergraduate, whetted my appetite for research and gave me the opportunity to study mathematics further.

Thank you also to Will Daniels and Serco Assurance for piquing my interest in industrial mathematics and providing me with such an interesting project to study during my third year as an undergraduate.

I would also like to thank the co-authors of my papers: Dr Mike Nieves for his encouragement, support and guidance; Dr Michele Brun for his hard-work, willingness to help, and knowledge, but mostly for his sense of humour; and Professor Ross McPhedran for his unsurpassed experience and knowledge of Mathematical Physics.

I should also like to thank fellow graduate student Stewart Haslinger, and indeed all the graduate students at the Department of Mathematical Sciences, primarily for giving me someone to moan at when work wasn’t progressing according to plan.

To my family, particularly my parents and sister, thank you for your love, support, and unwavering belief in me. Without you, I would not be the person I am today.

Above all I would like to thank my wife Nicola for her love and constant support, for all the late nights and early mornings, and for keeping me sane over the past few months. Thank you for being my muse, editor, proofreader, and sounding board. But most of all, thank you for being my best friend. I owe you everything.

Finally, despite my love for mathematics, the work reported in this thesis would not have been possible without the financial support of an EPSRC studentship (EP/H018514/1), for which I am grateful.

Contributor: @DanielColquitt

Source: Colquitt, D J (2013) Mathematical modelling of the dyamic response of metamaterial structures, PhD, Liverpool University

I am very grateful to them for sharing their expertise with a lowly undergraduate

There may be only two names on the title page, but this project exists because of the help and hard work of many people. I would like to thank Dr. Alda for being constantly supportive, helpful, and kind, whether we were meeting face-to-face or corresponding via email across the Atlantic. As well, this project would have gone nowhere without the patient guidance of Claire Slaney, Joanne Petite, and Ryan Blagdon. Dr. Barbara Pavlova was an invaluable extra set of eyes when I needed the feedback most, and Jeff Cullis was always there to save the day by finding data at a moment’s notice. The entire team at the Mood Disorders Clinic was a pleasure to work with, and I am very grateful to them for sharing their expertise with a lowly undergraduate. Finally, I would like to acknowledge the support of my family, friends, and every person who found themselves making small talk with me this year and listened with genuine (or feigned) interest when I described what I was working on. Thank you.

Contributor: Jacqueline Vincent

Source: Vincent J (2012) Cognitive dysfunction in bipolar disorder with and without comorbid diabetes mellitus, BSc, Dalhousie University

…the discerning input of my brilliant proof readers

I’d like to thank Dave Millard for his support and guidance through the course of this research. His uncanny ability to ask searching, difficult questions has undoubtedly strengthened my critical abilities, not to mention this work. My thanks also extend to Andy Stanford-Clark, whose shrewd input and enthusiasm have kept me on track and engaged.

I’ve had the good fortune to have guidance from many others, notably including my second supervisors Dave de Roure and Mark Weal. I’m grateful to the many study participants who so generously gave up their time, and for the discerning input of my brilliant proof readers. This work was also made possible by IBM’s generous support.

The communities at IBM Hursley and LSL have been welcoming and supportive, while figures such as Faith Lawrence and Max Wilson been role models for conducting doctoral-level research. I continue to draw inspiration from those around me, particularly Wendy Hall and Nate Matias, who achieve great goals with dedication and hard work while supporting the many communities around them.

I’m lucky to have many wonderful people in my life, and I’d like to thank them for their support: amongst people too numerous to list, my thanks extend to Reena, Jane, Don, Thomas, John-Mark, Ruth ‘n’ Tim, Alan, Hugh, Dave and the OGC crowd. Thanks for putting up with me!

Finally, and most of all, my thanks to Alisdair for his unfailing support, which is too extensive to enumerate.

Contributor: @ClareJHooper

Source: EngD, University of Southampton

I am very grateful to all those who have given me their friendship, put up with my odd hours, and provided me with lifts and practical help

My thanks are due first to my Director of Studies, Dr Martin Polley, of the School of Education, University of Southampton (formerly of King Alfred’s College of Higher Education, Winchester), and my Second Supervisor, Professor Joyce Goodman, of University College, Winchester, for their guidance, encouragement and enthusiasm for my project over the years. My thanks are also directed at my Academic Advisor, Dr Terence Rodgers, of Bath Spa University College, for advice and comments on particular aspects of the thesis, and to Professor Roger Richardson, University College, Winchester, for his initial help and supervision of the project. I am grateful to Dr Malcolm Smith, of the University of Wales, Lampeter, and Dr Chris Aldous, of University College, Winchester, for their examining input at the upgrade stage.

University College, Winchester also provided a lively research community and I am grateful to other staff and postgraduates for their support and ideas, in particular Dr Stephanie Spencer for allowing me to practise verbally expounding my ideas. King Alfred’s generously funded the initial three years of study, and has subsequently funded attendance at conferences, giving me further opportunities to present my work and discuss issues with established historians. It also funded participation at workshops, including those concerning the digitisation of historical resources. The library, in particular Miranda Nield-Dumper, patiently ordered many inter-library loans, and the ITCS Department ensured that my computer remained in working order, whilst Ian Short (software developer) and Lynne Frost (née Biltcliffe) (IT Trainer) also provided help with the initial development of the project database. I am exceptionally grateful to Dr James Heather, University of Surrey at Guildford, who has spent many hours developing the project database to my requirements, even whilst completing his own PhD.

An extensive amount of time has been spent in archives and record offices, and I thank all the staff for the help and advice given, particularly the following: Michael Moody at the Imperial War Museum; Anna Green and Joy Eldridge of the Mass-Observation Archives; Katrina Royall and others at the Victoria & Albert Museum; the Public Record Office; the British Library, in particular The British Library Newspaper Library, Colindale; Churchill Archives Centre, Cambridge; the London Transport Museum; the House of Lords Record Office; the Wellcome Institute and the Women’s Library.

I am also indebted to other libraries that allowed me to use their facilities in the course of my research, in particular Winchester School of Art Library, the Hartley Library, University of Southampton; the Institute for Historical Research; St. Peter’s Library, University of Brighton; Templeman Library, University of Kent at Canterbury, and the library at the University of Sussex. I am very appreciative of University College, Winchester who allowed me to attend the ‘Research Methodology’ module from ‘MA in Regional and Local History and Archaeology’, and Winchester School of Art, who allowed me to attend selected lectures from ‘MA: Art and Ideology in Europe 1917-1968’, both free of charge. I also appreciate the University of Kent at Canterbury, who allowed me to attend selected lectures from their ‘MA in Propaganda, Persuasion and History’. I am very grateful to all those who have written to me, particularly those who completed my questionnaire in 1997 and 1998, from which I received much useful information.

Personally, I would like to thank my family and friends for supporting me throughout the years, financially, practically and with moral support, especially my parents. I am exceptionally grateful to Andrew Frost for providing me with a room at a rate that I could afford to stay in Winchester for a key time. Particular thanks goes to Toby and Nicky Robinson and Justin Wood for providing me with places to stay whilst conducting extensive research in London, and to Dr Justine Cooper, who alongside such practical help, provided beneficial advice arising from her previous experience as a Winchester PhD student. Kate Stephens gave me exceptional moral support, Karen Neal allowed me to practise explaining my thesis, David and Chris Quayle were supportive landlords during the final months of writing, and there are many more whom I could name, including Amanda Henocq and Helen Hobbs, but the list would be absurdly long. I am very grateful to all those who have given me their friendship, put up with my odd hours, and provided me with lifts and practical help.

Contributor: @ww2poster

Source: Lewis, B (2004) The Planning, Design and Reception of British Home Front Propaganda Posters of the Second World War, PhD, University College Winchester

my brothers Nikolas and James Bowe for their programming advice and motivation

I thank my supervisor Simon Puglisi for his patience and guidance, Juha Kärkkäinen (University of Helsinki) for helping me to understand RRR, and Francisco Claude (University of Waterloo) for his advice and explanation of his code. I also thank my brothers Nikolas and James Bowe for their programming advice and motivation. Finally, I thank RMIT University for providing me with a scholarship to complete this paper.

Contributor: @alexbowe
Source: Multiary Wavelet Trees in Practice, Honours Thesis, RMIT Melbourne

Thank you all for allowing me the opportunity to grow up around such wonderful people

I would like the thank my supervisors Professor Nigel R. Shadbolt and Dr David E. Millard, for their irreplaceable guidance. My sister Joy gets a special mention for putting so much time and effort into proof reading my thesis – now you know what your brother gets up to! Since starting my PhD I have had access to a wealth of knowledge and have been given the opportunity to immerse myself within a vibrant and exciting research community, and this would not have been possible without the support of my supervisors and the research group as a whole. A big thanks to all of my friends in the Intelligence, Agents, Multimedia (IAM) group for making me feel at home in Southampton, without you none of this would have been worthwhile. I would also like to thank the AKTors for all of the stimulating conversations I was fortunate to be a part of.

Here I will stress the importance of my family who have supported me from day one. A big thank you to my mother Minoo, without you I would have been nothing, my sister Joy who has brought me nothing but, and my late father Paul for helping me put everything into context. Thank you all for allowing me the opportunity to grow up around such wonderful people.

Following on from this I would also like to give special thanks Dr Antonis Loizou, Dr Mike O Jewell, Dr Faith Lawrence, Dr Dave P Dupplaw, Dr Harith Alani, Dr Martin Szomszor, and Dr Kieron O’Hara for their collaborative efforts during my studentship. I should also thanks Dr Mark Weal, Dr Yves Raimond, Parastou Marashi for helping proof my thesis and for being so lovely. I would also like to thank Professor Dame Wendy Hall for her support and guidance throughout the years, and would like to thank Susan Davies for everything she has done for me.

I should thank all of my friends for making my life enjoyable and eventful: Sebastien Francois for being there whenever need be, Dr Paul Groth for friendship and a critical eye, Dr Steve Munroe, Dr Simone Scaringi and Dr Antonis Loizou for making my house feel like a home. Finally, I would like to thank Dr Ashley Smith for his cynicism and company throughout.

Finally, I should also thank the people at Garlik Ltd, my current employer, who have been very supportive of my studies and my interests in the Semantic Web, Privacy, and Personal Information. And finally I should give a big thank you to Steve Harris, for showing me an enthusiasm for Web technologies, engineering, software design, and for helping me take my interests forward.

This work was supported under the Advanced Knowledge Technologies (AKT) Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration (IRC), which is sponsored by the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council under grant number GR/N15764/01.

Contributor: @mischatuffield
Source: Tuffield, M. (2010) Telling Your Story: Autobiographical Metadata and the Semantic Web PhD. Thesis – University of Southampton