She was proud of me despite finding the obsession with sex rather embarrassing

Dedication

I dedicate this thesis to my father, Dr Jack Martin Kirkman, MB, BS (1918-1994). He was an adventurer and autodidact who learnt to drive in a T-Model Ford and to fly in a Tiger Moth, later flying Spitfires as a fighter pilot. He enrolled in medicine as a mature age student and was valued and respected as a general practitioner. With his adventurous spirit, interest in technology, support for social justice, and pursuit of lifelong learning Jack has been an inspiration and role model.

Acknowledgements

Relationships are complicated and I have some complicated relationships with the people acknowledged here. I first met Christopher Fox when I visited him in his office to ask if he was interested in supervising my candidature. Supervision has been complicated over the five years of candidature yet Chris has been a constant source of support and influence, even during the middle period when he was not an official supervisor. When I needed someone Chris came back on board as an honorary associate supervisor demonstrating dedication and belief in the topic—and me. Thank you; you rock. Thank you to Virginia Dickson-Swift who took on the role of principal supervisor and cheerfully assisted in steering me through to the end with prompt feedback, practical working structures and useful conversations. I appreciate that Amanda Kenny accepted me as a candidate and later connected me with Cindy Masaro, which led to a visit to Canada. Rob Townsend briefly stepped in as supervisor. I am very grateful for the participants who gave their time, stories and insights; and without whom this research would not exist.

Actual and virtual communities have made a huge contribution to my learning and ultimate success in the PhD process. The Health Sciences post-grad lab at La Trobe Bendigo has gone through a few locations and different populations. My initial companion in the dungeon lab was Karen Marshall whose friendship and intelligence was vital for a number of reasons. One of her excellent skills was to listen intently and have useful contributions to make when my ideas were unfocussed, managing to find the point I was struggling to express. In the latest iteration of the post-grad lab (not a dungeon; it has great views of sky) the collegiality and sense of community has been an example of how such things should be. Charon Freebody, Elena Wilson and Diana Guzys gave friendship and willingness to participate in discussions. Twitter has been like an associate supervisor and through the discussions, links to resources, and community culture of #phdchat I have had access to a 24/7 source of support and up-to-date ideas. The #sexgeekdom community, online and in person, has been a source of friendship, current research and fun times. Daniel Reeders has been a great sounding board and source of up-to-date information on matters HIV and STI, theory, and health promotion. Mark Tolley kept me functioning with therapeutic massage and simultaneous thoughtful insights. Caitlin Whiteman tested her new editing skills and did a brilliant and speedy job of editing the manuscript, teaching me new things as she went.

Cindy Masaro generously invited a complete stranger to stay for a month, and shared ideas, support and encouragement, in Canada and via Skype. Joy Johnson gave time, wisdom and generosity in allowing me to visit the Institute for Gender and Health at the University of British Columbia and provided supervision while I was there in August 2012.

My family has been encouraging, supportive and shown belief in me and my work. I am sad that my mother, Yvonne Kirkman, died before the thesis was finished; she was proud of me despite finding the obsession with sex rather embarrassing.

Huge thanks, love and appreciation go to Jim Ettles who manages a very complicated relationship with grace and generosity.

Contributor: Linda Kirkman

Source: Kirkman, L (2015) Doing relationships differently: rural baby boomers negotiate friends-with-benefits relationships, PhD, La Trobe University Melbourne

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Mum – it might all have been worth it in the end!

I  would like to take this opportunity to thank a few people who have made the process of writing this dissertation somewhat easier during the past year.

Firstly, I would like to thank my supervisor, Dr. William Webster, for being patient, encouraging and supportive. Also for giving me lots of valuable advice that has certainly made this project a lot easier to complete.

Thank you to Topshop and Stirling University Library for allowing me to use them as case studies for this project.

To Catherine and Amber for taking part in the study, you helped me out a lot. Thank you.

To Justine, who has managed to keep me smiling through the hardest parts of this process and who I will always be grateful for, thank you.

Thank you to Doug, Ash and Jeff – our days out and banter has meant a lot to me and has kept my social life alive during this (somewhat isolating) process.

My friends have been a constant support and have kept me sane through the last few months: Thanks to Amy, Stuart, Gillian, Ailsa, Craig, John, Fiona, Christine, Adam M and Adam RF.

To Will and Debbie for providing me with very sound advice and endless support on the other side of a screen. Thank you.

To Niall, thank you. For absolutely nothing.

Thanks to Kyle, Sam and Rachel. Just because.

And finally, thank you to my parents, Mandy and John. Their endless support has meant more to me than I could possibly express and will be forever grateful to them for their assistance, comforting words and lovely hugs. Mum – it might all have been worth it in the end!

“What’s next?”

President Josiah Bartlet – The West Wing.

Contributor: @lornypoppins

Source: BA (Hons) Business Studies, Stirling University

The most encouraging and helpful friends I ever had

This journey of PhD research had its highs and lows; yet, I am most lucky to have enormous support along the way. Here, I would like to take the chance to say ‘thank-you’ to everyone.

My supervisory team has been great for the past three years. Professor Tom Inns and Professor Bill Nixon have been encouraging and supportive in supervising this project and the writing of this thesis. Thank you for the inspiring discussions and the enthusiasm toward the topic – I will definitely miss these wonderful conversations!

I am sincerely grateful to all the participants in my research, especially David Townson, Ben Reason, Nick Marsh, Florence Andrews, Gill Wildman and Nick Durrant for sharing the five insights Service Design stories. Your openness is truly appreciated. This thesis would not be possible without these stories and the reflections you shared with me. Thank you for spending your valuable time reviewing and offering feedback on the case studies. Also, from online forums and conferences, I have received useful information and insights from researchers and practitioners from various backgrounds. Here I would like to thank all of you for contributing to the research.

My dear colleagues and friends, Jonathan Baldwin, Nadia Svirydzenka, Fan Xia and Lauren Tan, have been the most encouraging and helpful friends I ever had!

I would like to thank Hazel Field from the Master of Design programme at the University of Dundee and all the students from the past three years, for the wonderful teaching experience alongside the PhD experience. I learned more than I could expect from the teachers and students on this creative and interdisciplinary course.

Finally but most importantly, to my parents, who have always been my motivation and inspiration, even though they cannot be with me in rainy Scotland!

Contributor: @Qin_Han
Source: Han, Q. (2010) Practices and Principles in Service Design, PhD, University of Dundee

Because of you, all this was made possible

To use the terminology from the service blueprint (after all, research is a kind of public service) ─ I may be the one interacting with you, the reader, but I would not be able to do it without all the people in the back office, be they colleagues, friends or professional acquaintances. A warm thank you to…
… my advisors; Stefan Holmlid for always being open to discuss new ideas and concepts and encouraging me to find my way in the research landscape. The plentiful short two-minute-discussions are invaluable! Arne Jönsson, for your no-bullshit attitude and providing a different angle so that I do not get caught up in the service design-bubble. Björn Alm, for many fruitful discussions and reflections, especially when it comes to the methodology.
… my informants. Without the willingness to share their ways of working and produced visualisations, this thesis could not have been. I’ve been fortunate enough to have 21 practicing service designers from 15 companies in seven countries to sharing their time and efforts with me.
… the IxS research group (Eva L, Eva R, Johan B, Johan Å, Matti and Stefan) for good discussions and an open climate. There is always someone to strike up a conversation on any given design-related topic or just chit-chat with for five minutes. And of course the weekly meetings with cake!
… my fellow PhD students (past and present) and others who join in on the so well needed coffee breaks; Amy, Anna, Arne, Jody, Johan, Jonas, Lars, Maria, Magnus, Sanna and Sara. I think it’s time for the next PhD pub soon though…
… everyone who has helped in one way or another in making this thesis take the shape it is, be it modelling (Anna), photographing (Jonas), proof reading (dad), sharing typographic formatting (Sanna) or giving feedback on the presentation of my ideas in the thesis (Stefan, Björn, Arne and Johan). And a special thank you the tweeters who have responded to my thesis-related tweets, be it questions about nuances in the use of English words or encouraging pads on the virtual back.
… Diana, Pacenti & Tassi for letting me re-print their model in the thesis.
… all my friends who make life as good as it is.
… my parents. Because of you, all this was made possible. You always believe in me and encourage me to find my own path through life, and support me along the path.


Contributor: @segelstrom
Source: Segelström, F (2010) Visualisations in Service Design Licentiate of Philosophy – Linköping University