Thank you for being my muse, editor, proofreader, and sounding board

Carrying out the requisite work and then writing this thesis was, undoubtably, the most arduous task I have undertaken. However, one of the joys of having completed the thesis is looking back at everyone who has helped me over the past three, seven, and twenty-five years.

I would like to begin by thanking my three supervisors: Professors Sasha Movchan, Ian Jones, and Natasha Movchan. It is an often used cliché, but in this case it is no overstatement to say that without the consistent guidance, tutelage, support, unparalleled knowledge, and encouragement of my three supervisors, this thesis would never have existed. In particular, I would like to thank Natasha who went above and beyond to read every line of the manuscript in meticulous detail. I must say a special thank you to Sasha and Ian who, during my third year as an undergraduate, whetted my appetite for research and gave me the opportunity to study mathematics further.

Thank you also to Will Daniels and Serco Assurance for piquing my interest in industrial mathematics and providing me with such an interesting project to study during my third year as an undergraduate.

I would also like to thank the co-authors of my papers: Dr Mike Nieves for his encouragement, support and guidance; Dr Michele Brun for his hard-work, willingness to help, and knowledge, but mostly for his sense of humour; and Professor Ross McPhedran for his unsurpassed experience and knowledge of Mathematical Physics.

I should also like to thank fellow graduate student Stewart Haslinger, and indeed all the graduate students at the Department of Mathematical Sciences, primarily for giving me someone to moan at when work wasn’t progressing according to plan.

To my family, particularly my parents and sister, thank you for your love, support, and unwavering belief in me. Without you, I would not be the person I am today.

Above all I would like to thank my wife Nicola for her love and constant support, for all the late nights and early mornings, and for keeping me sane over the past few months. Thank you for being my muse, editor, proofreader, and sounding board. But most of all, thank you for being my best friend. I owe you everything.

Finally, despite my love for mathematics, the work reported in this thesis would not have been possible without the financial support of an EPSRC studentship (EP/H018514/1), for which I am grateful.

Contributor: @DanielColquitt

Source: Colquitt, D J (2013) Mathematical modelling of the dyamic response of metamaterial structures, PhD, Liverpool University

Mum – it might all have been worth it in the end!

I  would like to take this opportunity to thank a few people who have made the process of writing this dissertation somewhat easier during the past year.

Firstly, I would like to thank my supervisor, Dr. William Webster, for being patient, encouraging and supportive. Also for giving me lots of valuable advice that has certainly made this project a lot easier to complete.

Thank you to Topshop and Stirling University Library for allowing me to use them as case studies for this project.

To Catherine and Amber for taking part in the study, you helped me out a lot. Thank you.

To Justine, who has managed to keep me smiling through the hardest parts of this process and who I will always be grateful for, thank you.

Thank you to Doug, Ash and Jeff – our days out and banter has meant a lot to me and has kept my social life alive during this (somewhat isolating) process.

My friends have been a constant support and have kept me sane through the last few months: Thanks to Amy, Stuart, Gillian, Ailsa, Craig, John, Fiona, Christine, Adam M and Adam RF.

To Will and Debbie for providing me with very sound advice and endless support on the other side of a screen. Thank you.

To Niall, thank you. For absolutely nothing.

Thanks to Kyle, Sam and Rachel. Just because.

And finally, thank you to my parents, Mandy and John. Their endless support has meant more to me than I could possibly express and will be forever grateful to them for their assistance, comforting words and lovely hugs. Mum – it might all have been worth it in the end!

“What’s next?”

President Josiah Bartlet – The West Wing.

Contributor: @lornypoppins

Source: BA (Hons) Business Studies, Stirling University

It is the journey that I cherish, more than the destination

My journey of learning would not be as enriching as it is, if not for the following:

Almighty God, in whom I hope and from whom I draw my strength,  

My family, who have been very supportive,

Dr. Teresita Perez, for her time, unwaivering faith, love and sharing life with me and my blockmates ;), 

Mrs. Unson, for her patience and comforting presence,

Dr. Emilyn Espiritu, for her valuable inputs, inspiration and encouragement,

Dr. Emmanuel Anglo, for helping in the statistical aspects of the study and the inspiration to do more,

The Environmental Science Faculty, for being an inspiration for me to aspire for knowledge on different topics related to the environment,

Kuya Bert, Kuya Doy and Ate Weng, for their time and effort that has helped us in many ways,

Mang Pando, Tatay Edwin, Nanay Gemma and the community of San Buenaventura, Palacpacquen, San Pablo Laguna, for their hospitality and assitance in acquiring tulya,

Sir Ian Ken Dimzon of the NCIC, who helped us perform AAS, for his patience and kindness,

Sir Edsel Ramirez of the University of the Philippines Institute of Biology, for sharing his knowledge and expertise, 

Kuya Tatot, for the reminding me that nobody said it would be easy, but it would be worth it and that it’s not yet the end if its not a happy ending,

The Ateneo Student Trainers (most especially the Super Six) and theAteneo College Ministry Group who always understood the demands of being a student over being an org member,

The Bukas Palad Music Ministry, for the sense of community and belonging rooted in Christ and in music,

My Blockmates, with whom I have shared almost my entire college life with,

Most especially to Emee, Niko, Mamon, Jules, Benj, Joan, Beng, Pao, KDand coursemates Camille and Earl for the presence, laughter, chismis and love when we are in (the) lab :).

It is the journey that I cherish, more than the destination.

Contributor: @findingjemo

Source: Corbicula manilensis as a Potential Bio-indicator of Sublethal Cadmium Levels in Aquatic Environments

…willingness to do lunch and provide instant messenger counseling on demand

To my husband Luke Mewburn: without whom I could not have completed this work. Not only did he offer unstinting love, support and encouragement, but he has proved himself to be a man who is proud to have a wife who has a few more degrees on the wall than he does.

To my son Brendan, age seven, who has endured his mother undertaking two post graduate degrees in the span his short life to date. His affection, patience and willingness to play Nintendo for long periods of time can never be fully rewarded in the form of a completed thesis, but I hope he will read it one day anyway.

Without the financial and material support of the Melbourne School of Design at the University of Melbourne this thesis would never have been written. I wish to thank the institution for generously providing me with free tuition and a living stipend during my candidature, as well as supporting study related overseas travel and expenses.

I am indebted to Brent Allpress from the Architecture and Design School at RMIT University for sparking my interest in gesture and to my supervisor, Dr Scott Drake, who gave me latitude to explore the topic in my own way while constantly providing encouragement, advice and guidance. The other members of my supervisory panel: Dr Greg Missingham, Dr Sue Wilks and Dr Peter Raisbeck patiently read and commented on work in progress, providing me with valuable feedback and many interesting ideas. I would also like to thank Dr Scott Heyes of the University of Melbourne for helping me with methodology.

As a fieldwork based study, this thesis relied on the willingness of many students and teachers who agreed to work under my watchful gaze. They all have my heartfelt thanks. In particular I would like to thank the four main teachers who are shown at work in this study: Dr Peter Corrigan, Dr Pia Ednie Brown, Ms Anna Johnson and Mr Simon Wollan. They not only (bravely) opened up their classrooms to me, but they also took the time to help me develop my ideas about the nature of design teaching practice.

I would not have made much progress theoretically without the actor-network theory discussion group at the University of Melbourne, convened by Professor Diane Mulcahy of the Graduate School of Education. The members of the group always made me feel welcome, even though I was a foreigner from the Melbourne School of Design. Lyn Campbell should be singled out as a generous and thoughtful scholar who took the time to walk with me through this intellectual jungle and point out the promising parts of the undergrowth. I would also like to thank Helena Webster of Oxford Brookes University for encouragement and support and Professor Robin Usher, who deserves special thanks for being both an intellectual mentor and supportive boss.

I have been lucky to be surrounded by many other intelligent and thoughtful people who were ready to hear me rehearse argumentation and theories as I progressed through the study, in particular Dr Robyn Barnacle (who has borne the brunt of it) as well as Beatriz Maturana, Janne Morton and Joan Grieg (for the emails). I can never adequately repay the generosity of Dr Bernard Brown for reading the first draft so thoroughly and well. The feedback from Ian Woodcock, Crystal Legacy, Wiryono Rahajo, Julie Rudner and our facilitator, Harriet Searcy, during the writing circle sponsored by the University of Melbourne was invaluable, as was the support from Jane Trewin and Lorenne Wilks of the Research office in the ABP faculty.

I would also like to thank all my friends, in particular Weiss Zhao, Andrew Maher, Colleen Boyle, Jacques Kosky, Felicity Jones, Elanor Parsons, John Ting, Angela Alessi and various other members of the ‘Pods’ for conversations, both of the intellectual and “troubles telling” variety, which kept me sane throughout. My colleagues at the Graduate Research Office at RMIT University, particularly Helen Lethanks for being so great to work with – and for all the cakes.

My extended family have been supportive throughout and I would like to give a shout out to the Mewburns and the Blackfords for all the dinners, lunches and the baby sitting, in particular Barb and Steve Mewburn. Thanks to my father, Roger, always a good academic role model, who pointed out years ago the importance of reading ‘improving books’ and my mother, Velma, who would have been so proud had she lived to see me finish this thesis.

Finally heartfelt thanks and love to my twin sister, Anitra Nottingham, who was always ready to provide me with the benefit of her experience as a professional graphic designer and online teacher as well as willingness to do lunch and provide instant messenger counseling on demand.

Contributor: Inger Mewburn @thesiswhisperer More info here.
Source: Mewburn, I (2009) Constructing bodies: gesture, speech and representation at work in architectural design studios, PhD, University of Melbourne

Friends and family for being there when needed and forgiving my absence at other times

I have been able to undertake this Masters in Public Health because of the Welsh Assembly Government’s support for deprived communities in South Wales through the Department of General Practice, Cardiff University. I hope that the experience I have gained from this study will help me to contribute to the reduction of inequalities in health in these areas. I am very appreciative of the opportunities available to develop academic skills afforded by the foresight of those who have sought funding for the programmes I and others are working within.

Shortly after I began working in Wales, Dr. John Watkins introduced me to the Caerphilly Health and Social Needs Survey. I am grateful for our initial discussions and his encouragement to study this area in greater depth.

My supervisor, Dr. David Fone, has been very patient and I am thankful for his guidance whilst I worked on this topic.

I would like to thank friends and family for being there when needed and forgiving my absence at other times. And last but not least, my warmest thanks to Chris for his continual caring and kindness.

Contributor: @amcunningham
Source: Cunningham, A.M. (2004) Social Capital and Smoking. MA in Public Health, Cardiff University