I am very grateful to them for sharing their expertise with a lowly undergraduate

There may be only two names on the title page, but this project exists because of the help and hard work of many people. I would like to thank Dr. Alda for being constantly supportive, helpful, and kind, whether we were meeting face-to-face or corresponding via email across the Atlantic. As well, this project would have gone nowhere without the patient guidance of Claire Slaney, Joanne Petite, and Ryan Blagdon. Dr. Barbara Pavlova was an invaluable extra set of eyes when I needed the feedback most, and Jeff Cullis was always there to save the day by finding data at a moment’s notice. The entire team at the Mood Disorders Clinic was a pleasure to work with, and I am very grateful to them for sharing their expertise with a lowly undergraduate. Finally, I would like to acknowledge the support of my family, friends, and every person who found themselves making small talk with me this year and listened with genuine (or feigned) interest when I described what I was working on. Thank you.

Contributor: Jacqueline Vincent

Source: Vincent J (2012) Cognitive dysfunction in bipolar disorder with and without comorbid diabetes mellitus, BSc, Dalhousie University

If love makes you think, then this thesis is entirely a group effort

This research was made possible by funding from the Economic and Social Research Council (award number R00429634018). I also gratefully acknowledge financial assistance from the University of London Central Research Fund for fieldwork expenses. My sponsors may not, of course, be best pleased to hear that what I most appreciated about the wonderful gift of full-time education free from material need was the opportunity it offered for me to daydream, to bake my own bread, to conduct a community campaign and to spend hours writing my ‘relationship diaries’. What I gained from these diversions, however, I try to recognise in this thesis: the realisation that learning does not happen as, when and where we might expect it to.

I would like to thank: Dr. Debbie Epstein for supervision during David Buckingham’s absence, and Dr. Sally Munt and Dr. Chris Richards (who both survived reading the whole thing) for their helpful and constructive comments. All the teachers who assisted my ideas at training days and workshops throughout the process, and particularly Jenny Grahame at the English and Media Centre. Participants at the Institute of Education Cultural Studies Research Group: Chris Richards, Angela Devas, Lyn Thomas, Julian Sefton-Green, Pete Fraser, Muriel Robinson, Hyeon-Seon Jeong, Chris Fanthome, Liesbeth de Block, Keith Perera, Elizabeth Funge, Rebekah Willett, Paul Ward, Jon Swain, Sue Cranmer and Shereen Benjamin.  My colleagues in Brighton Urban Design and Development played an indirect but significant role by helping me learn how to turn my ‘feelings’ about a place into political action. (Or perhaps I should thank instead the Sainsbury’s consortium and its allies in Brighton and Hove Council, for reminding me how it feels to be belittled and dismissed when you want to talk about something that matters to you…).

I am indebted to ‘Geoff’ and ‘Kate’ – most obviously for their tolerance of my repeated presence in their classrooms and persistent questioning, but more generally for their demonstration in action of the meaning of dedicated and all too frequently unsung pedagogical work.  I would like to thank all students at all stages of my work, and to mention especially Guy Barton, Matt King, Gareth Ransome, Charlie Whitaker and the others from Sussex who got me started.

Special thanks go to Professor David Buckingham – perhaps just for having faith when I didn’t, but also for doing all the things an excellent supervisor should do.  These included: making it safe to show him work by treating drafts as drafts and ‘reflecting back’ the worthwhile elements scattered within them; directing me towards just the reading that I needed to develop my thoughts; establishing structures I could cling to when I felt swamped; consistently failing to be stern, hypercritical and authoritarian when I expected it of him; and, ultimately, letting me take my own path, tortured and tortuous as it may have seemed to him.  All of which means that – as in any successful pedagogical relationship – I have learnt more from him than I can possibly put into words.

Writing up felt like being lost in a long dark tunnel. I’d be there still if it weren’t for: Rowena Herdman-Smith, Deirdre Leask, Sally Munt, Elizabeth Draper, Sophie Powell, Rachel Cottam, Karen Adler, Margaretta Jolly, Ken Pringle, John Devine, Tom Shakespeare, amongst others. If love makes you think, then this thesis is entirely a group effort.

This is especially for Melita, who knows that it is not only Dracula who is invited to appear in girls’ bedrooms at night. For Kerry, for his tales from the outside world; Tina, for the knife; for Ben, who struggles over power with me despite himself.  And finally, for Clare who is everywhere here, although only she will ever know quite how much.

Contributor: Sara Bragg

Source: Bragg, S (2000) Media Violence and Education: A Study of Youth Audiences and the Horror Genre, PhD, Institute of Education, London

Princess Nisa, you really are a little princess (and now it’s written in the Trinity College Library, so it must be true!)

Kenneth Henry – thanks for being a great supervisor and a good sport. Andrew ‘brain the size of a planet’ Lloyd, my mentor – Thank You For Sharing. None of it would have been the same if I wasn’t in such a positive, encouraging environment with the rest of the Wolfe Cubs. Karsten working side-by-side with you for the stuff of Chapter 4 was a great experience. I hope all my future collaborations are as fruitful and good-natured. Cathal and Lucy, the predecessors, thanks for showing me that it can be done (and how to do it!). Avril, thanks for always being willing to direct your insightful intellect towards my problems. Simon thanks for your willingness to help with anything. All of you, and the new folks, Antoinette, Kevin, and Sean, thanks for being so understanding and helpful while I’ve been writing up. Thanks also to Denis Shields for the suggestion of the block overlap simulations in Chapter 4, and all the members of the Tuesday lunchtime group for helpful comments over the years.

My family and friends deserve special thanks for supporting me in various ways. Mum – thanks for Friday lunchtimes in Dunnes & Crescenzi’s and ‘Friday Presents’. Dad – the running total is 2135 Brownie Points, a few more and you’ll have enough for a toaster. Emer – those cinema outings helped me stay relaxed, thanks. Wendy, my adopted Scottish sister and bestest friend – thanks for always dropping everything at a moment’s notice and making everything so much fun. Thanks to Gianluca for lots of emotional support and for help with footnotes and other LATEX oddities. Thanks to my ‘roomies’, Lisa and Emma Jane, for being great pals. Princess Nisa, you really are a little princess (and now it’s written in the Trinity College Library, so it must be true!). The girls on the rugby team definitely helped me keep my sanity by allowing me to vent my frustrations by tipping them upside-down in the mud of College Park … thanks!

Contributor: @aoifemcl

Source: PhD, Trinity College Dublin – for more on Aoife’s work

…to Chris, for not letting me not do it, and for understanding and being wonderful

Dedication

This thesis is dedicated to the memory of my Mum, Pavla Marie Atherton, to whom I never really got to explain much of this, but who approved. She would have been tickled to see me wearing a mortarboard.

Acknowledgements

I would like to thank my supervisors,

Dr Charles Leek (University of Wales, Bangor), Dr Neil Thacker (University of Manchester), and Professor Alan Jackson (University of Manchester)

for their kind help and endless patience, and also for just letting me get on with it. I am particularly indebted to Charles for his helpful suggestions and unfailing geniality.

I would like to express my profound gratitude to Dr Guillaume Thierry (University of Wales, Bangor), for his tireless assistance with the ERP study, which was very much appreciated.

Thanks are also due to the following people, without whose patient technical assistance I would not have been able to complete the work presented here:

Mark Roberts (University of Wales, Bangor) Dr Shane McKie (University of Manchester) Yvon Watson (University of Manchester) Dr Igor Hollander (formerly of the University of Manchester)

I would also like to thank Professor Neil Roberts (University of Liverpool) and Dr Rob Ward (University of Wales, Bangor) for their helpful comments and suggestions for improvements to this thesis.

Last, and most importantly, love and thanks to my parents, Pavla and Graham, for believing I could do it, and to Chris, for not letting me not do it, and for understanding and being wonderful.

Contributor: @finiteattention
Source: Atherton, C (2005) The Neurobiology of Object Constancy, PhD, University of Wales, Bangor