Train journeys at ungodly hours

The Golden Age is before us, not behind us

Sallust 

First of all, a huge “thank you” to my supervisor for these past, nearly four, years, Professor David Collison, for his unflagging support and advice of one sort and another. Hopefully all those train journeys at ungodly hours paid off.

Also, thanks to Mark Whiteley, one of the nicest and most helpful people imaginable, who supervised my 3rd-year and MChem projects, for setting me off on further roads, and to both Emma and Hannah for their good influence then and since.

To Professors Eric McInnes and Richard Winpenny for advice and inspiration. Sorry this took so long Richard, it wasn’t deliberate, honest!

To Iain May for what seems to have been a career defining chat a long, long time ago…

In the Magnets Group and beyond, thanks to Floriana Tuna for her expertise with EPR and SQUID. To Stephen Sproules for help with EPR and being so knowledgeable about almost everything, danke sehr. Thanks to Asad for everything over the past eight (help!) years. Won’t forget seeing England keep The Ashes at Old Trafford, rain and all. To Eufemio, Panama’s greatest scientist! One day, maybe, I’ll get there… Thanks to Luke and Tom for being magnets-heroes to worship. To all those past and present members who’ve offered up some help or advice, you’re all wonderful. A special thanks to those who had to endure my tortuous writing up and for their (unwitting or otherwise) support through it, especially James, Sam and Claire.

For the newer Magnets Group members at Manchester and those venturing abroad (Scotland), best wishes! Keep your enthusiasm if possible. And good luck to all MChem students who passed through my orbit. I noticed not many of you stuck with chemistry though… To the latest project students Tom (Prodigy) and Hatty, I hope you get what you want!

Even more recently I made the geographically short move to the National EPR Service. I’m so grateful to know the wonderful people Chloe, Simon and Dan who haunt the Alan Turing Building. Thanks for keeping me at least slightly sane whilst figuring things out over there!

To my brothers John and Ben: Hurrah, made it this far! Thanks for all the things that have made this more bearable. Maybe all those weird side-projects can get done now… rockets, weather balloons, rail-guns, prog-rock albums??? So much to catch up with…

Lastly, thanks to my parents for all the moral support and the amazing chances they’ve given me over the years (not to mention living in the same house as me and John for the past few years in particular).

Contributor: Joseph Sharples

Source: Sharples, J (2013) Cooling Rapidly and Relaxing Slowly with 4f Ions, PhD, University of Manchester

To the sockeye, at the heart of this endeavor, Here’s hoping your populations will flourish, for ever and EVER!

It’s been a long road, but here I am at the end,
but there are so many people to whom thanks I extend!

First and foremost, is a well-deserved thanks to Prof Hinch,
Without your support and encouragement, I’d be in a real pinch!
Great mentorship, so approachable, good advice is your game,
You even sent me to a wonderful salmon conference in Spain!

David Patterson is next, the fert experiment gu-ru,
I’m not sure that this project would’ve been possible without you! (and E-watch)
You taught me the art of gamete collection and experimental design,
You’ve been an excellent editor and given me so much of your time!

Dr. John Richardson completes my committee of three,
A big thanks for your input, careful edits, and smile so cheer-y!

And I could never forgot all the helpers – SO MANY!
But the king of them all is most surely field Andy,
Mr. Lotto you’re a genius, a wet-lab master-mind,
A more knowledgeable, reliable, positive worker one could not find!

There are so many great people who assisted in lab-fishy fun,
Jayme, Lisa, Merran, Jessica, Vanessa, D’Arcy to name some!
Lucas taught me to swim sockeye, with Lindsay we swam 2000+ fry,
All Hinch members helped with ferts, picking morts, counting ‘eyed’.

But who are these “Hinch members”? This fantabulous crew!
What made these years great was working alongside of you!
Marika, Mike, Erika, Kim, Eduardo, Tim, and Roscoe,
Matt, Al, Kendra, Charlotte, Brian, who could say no?
And there’s Andrea, and Eric, and even dear Glen,
And last(just because),is cheery ol’ Ken!

Now life as a student, isn’t all milk and honey,
And I’m very thankful to the sources that have supported me financially!
A Faculty of Forestry Recruitment Award allowed me to initiate my work,
Followed by the Mary and David Macaree Fellowship and a one-year NSERC.

But the support I have leaned on, quite possibly the most,
Is the kind that all grad students most certainly boast,
It comes from my friends, loved ones, and close famil-y,
Who have kept me a-float when times were hard or craz-y.

To mom, dad, Will, and Sam, you have been so supreme,
You have nurtured my learning, supported my dreams!
And at last to the sockeye, at the heart of this endeavor,
Here’s hoping your populations will flourish, for ever and EVER!

Featuring Dr. Scott Hinch, Andrew Lotto, Jayme Hills, Lisa Thompson, Merran Hague, Jessica Carter, Vanessa Ives, D’Arcy McKay, Lucas Pon, Lindsay Neilsen, Marika Gale, Michael Donaldson, Erika Eliason, Kim Hruska, Eduardo Martins, Timothy Clark, David Roscoe, Matt Drenner, Alison Collins, Kendra Robinson, Charlotte Whitney, Brian Ma, Andrea Haas, Erik Vogt, Glenn Crossin, Ken Jeffries

Contributor: Jennifer Burt

Source: Burt J M (2011) Influences of parental identity and elevated incubation temperature on the survival, development and early life history traits in sockeye salmon, MSc, University of British Columbia

Thanks to all those on #phdchat…for the enormous help, moral support, motivation and kindness

To describe this as a journey is an understatement. It has been hard work, ridiculously difficult at times, but extremely rewarding, and I am surprised and amazed to have made it to this point. I have a number of people to thank for their support in getting this far on this doctoral journey.

First, thanks very much to my supervisor Ron Thompson, for his constant support, advice, calmness and tenacity over the last five years, and also to Roger Crawford my second supervisor for his advice on my draft thesis, and a big thanks to all the tutors who generously gave up their time for me to interview them.

Next on the list, a massive thank you to my husband, Duncan, and my lovely children, Nicola, Sam, and Lauren for all their love and support, for putting up with my moods and grumpiness at times, and for allowing me time away from family stuff to get this thing completed, and to you this thesis is dedicated. I am also forever indebted to my mum and dad for all they sacrificed for us, and thanks also to my lovely brothers: Dave and Pete; and sisters: Janet and Debbie, who are so supportive in whatever I do in my life.

A huge thank you to two very special colleagues: Cath Ellis, for believing in me and giving me the confidence to start on and continue on this doctoral journey; and to Liz Bennett, who I have been lucky enough to have had travelling this same journey alongside me, and whose constant support, practical advice and optimism has helped to keep me going, and dragged me to the finish line. I’d also like to thank Cheryl Reynolds and David Powell for all their support along the way.

Finally thanks to all those on #phdchat on Twitter, too many to name individually, for the enormous help, moral support, motivation and kindness. Phdchat is a great example of the affordances of social media, providing a personal learning network of doctoral students worldwide supporting and collaborating together.

Contributor: @SueFolley

Source: Folley, S (2013) Bridging the gap between face-to-face and online teaching: a case study exploring tutors’ early experiences of teaching online in a UK university 2009-2012. Doctoral thesis, University of Huddersfield

Mum – it might all have been worth it in the end!

I  would like to take this opportunity to thank a few people who have made the process of writing this dissertation somewhat easier during the past year.

Firstly, I would like to thank my supervisor, Dr. William Webster, for being patient, encouraging and supportive. Also for giving me lots of valuable advice that has certainly made this project a lot easier to complete.

Thank you to Topshop and Stirling University Library for allowing me to use them as case studies for this project.

To Catherine and Amber for taking part in the study, you helped me out a lot. Thank you.

To Justine, who has managed to keep me smiling through the hardest parts of this process and who I will always be grateful for, thank you.

Thank you to Doug, Ash and Jeff – our days out and banter has meant a lot to me and has kept my social life alive during this (somewhat isolating) process.

My friends have been a constant support and have kept me sane through the last few months: Thanks to Amy, Stuart, Gillian, Ailsa, Craig, John, Fiona, Christine, Adam M and Adam RF.

To Will and Debbie for providing me with very sound advice and endless support on the other side of a screen. Thank you.

To Niall, thank you. For absolutely nothing.

Thanks to Kyle, Sam and Rachel. Just because.

And finally, thank you to my parents, Mandy and John. Their endless support has meant more to me than I could possibly express and will be forever grateful to them for their assistance, comforting words and lovely hugs. Mum – it might all have been worth it in the end!

“What’s next?”

President Josiah Bartlet – The West Wing.

Contributor: @lornypoppins

Source: BA (Hons) Business Studies, Stirling University