To the sockeye, at the heart of this endeavor, Here’s hoping your populations will flourish, for ever and EVER!

It’s been a long road, but here I am at the end,
but there are so many people to whom thanks I extend!

First and foremost, is a well-deserved thanks to Prof Hinch,
Without your support and encouragement, I’d be in a real pinch!
Great mentorship, so approachable, good advice is your game,
You even sent me to a wonderful salmon conference in Spain!

David Patterson is next, the fert experiment gu-ru,
I’m not sure that this project would’ve been possible without you! (and E-watch)
You taught me the art of gamete collection and experimental design,
You’ve been an excellent editor and given me so much of your time!

Dr. John Richardson completes my committee of three,
A big thanks for your input, careful edits, and smile so cheer-y!

And I could never forgot all the helpers – SO MANY!
But the king of them all is most surely field Andy,
Mr. Lotto you’re a genius, a wet-lab master-mind,
A more knowledgeable, reliable, positive worker one could not find!

There are so many great people who assisted in lab-fishy fun,
Jayme, Lisa, Merran, Jessica, Vanessa, D’Arcy to name some!
Lucas taught me to swim sockeye, with Lindsay we swam 2000+ fry,
All Hinch members helped with ferts, picking morts, counting ‘eyed’.

But who are these “Hinch members”? This fantabulous crew!
What made these years great was working alongside of you!
Marika, Mike, Erika, Kim, Eduardo, Tim, and Roscoe,
Matt, Al, Kendra, Charlotte, Brian, who could say no?
And there’s Andrea, and Eric, and even dear Glen,
And last(just because),is cheery ol’ Ken!

Now life as a student, isn’t all milk and honey,
And I’m very thankful to the sources that have supported me financially!
A Faculty of Forestry Recruitment Award allowed me to initiate my work,
Followed by the Mary and David Macaree Fellowship and a one-year NSERC.

But the support I have leaned on, quite possibly the most,
Is the kind that all grad students most certainly boast,
It comes from my friends, loved ones, and close famil-y,
Who have kept me a-float when times were hard or craz-y.

To mom, dad, Will, and Sam, you have been so supreme,
You have nurtured my learning, supported my dreams!
And at last to the sockeye, at the heart of this endeavor,
Here’s hoping your populations will flourish, for ever and EVER!

Featuring Dr. Scott Hinch, Andrew Lotto, Jayme Hills, Lisa Thompson, Merran Hague, Jessica Carter, Vanessa Ives, D’Arcy McKay, Lucas Pon, Lindsay Neilsen, Marika Gale, Michael Donaldson, Erika Eliason, Kim Hruska, Eduardo Martins, Timothy Clark, David Roscoe, Matt Drenner, Alison Collins, Kendra Robinson, Charlotte Whitney, Brian Ma, Andrea Haas, Erik Vogt, Glenn Crossin, Ken Jeffries

Contributor: Jennifer Burt

Source: Burt J M (2011) Influences of parental identity and elevated incubation temperature on the survival, development and early life history traits in sockeye salmon, MSc, University of British Columbia

Thank you for your enthusiasm, pride and curiosity to share my map of the world

It is a humbling experience to acknowledge those people who have, mostly out of kindness, helped along the journey of my PhD. I am indebted to so many for encouragement and support.

My sincerest thanks are extended to my project supervisor and mentor, Professor Mary Scholes, for her encouragement and guidance. Eskom and SASOL are acknowledged for their bursary and investment in the research. The National Research Foundation, Andrew Mellon Foundation and the University of the Witwatersrand are thanked for their post-graduate bursary support. The Eskom-SASOL Impacts Working group is acknowledged for their direction and feedback.

My research committee in the School of Animal, Plant and Environmental Sciences, Professors Graham Alexander and David Mycock (as chairmen), Dr Barend Erasmus, Dr Chris Herold and Dr Kristy Ross (as committee members), are thanked for their interest and valuable comments on the research. The reviewers of the three manuscripts submitted to journals are thanked for the constructive advice improving the quality of the manuscripts and this thesis.

Several people helped with: the collection of samples, analyses in the laboratory, the preparation of maps, providing advice for statistical analyses and they are all thanked for their contributions. Special mention goes to the support staff of the School of APES, Allison, Chris, Ewa, James, Jason, Kim, Lawrence, Leanne, Lydia, Rori, Ryan, Rob and Stephen C. for help in the field and lab, Stephen W. for assistance with some of the images, Cristy for proof-reading a draft of the thesis. Thanks also to Mr Joseph Mathai for statistical analyses, Prof Edward Witkowski for statistical advice and Ms Jolene Fisher for GIS and statistical advice. Dr Adri Kotze and team at BEM Labs (Pty) Ltd are thanked for their efficient service and prompt response to queries. My heart-felt thanks to Dr Nina Snyman for the private, hands-on tutorials in using ArcGIS. I am grateful to Super Group Limited for assistance with printing copies of the thesis.

To my many friends and family, you should know that your support and encouragement was worth more than I can express on paper.

Thank you Jenny and Meg for breakfasts, tea-breaks and advice – you were always there with a word of encouragement or listening ear.

To Carl – thank you for your enthusiasm, pride and curiosity to share my map of the world.

Mom and Bridget, you knew it would be a long and sometimes bumpy road, but encouraged and supported me along the way. Thank you.

To dad who was often in my thoughts on this journey – you are missed.

Contributor: @terr1firma

Source: Bird, T (2011) Some impacts of sulfur and nitrogen deposition on the soils and surface waters of the Highveld grasslands, South Africa, PhD, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg