A mentor and friend, from whom I have learnt the vital skill of disciplined critical thinking

Foremost, I would like to express my deepest thanks to my two supervisors, Professor Phil Trinder and Dr Patrick Maier. Their patience, encouragement, and immense knowledge were key motivations throughout my PhD. They carry out their research with an objective and principled approach to computer science. They persuasively conveyed an interest in my work, and I am grateful for my inclusion in their HPC-GAP project.

Phil has been my supervisor and guiding beacon through four years of computer science MEng and PhD research. I am truly thankful for his steadfast integrity, and selfless dedication to both my personal and academic development. I cannot think of a better supervisor to have. Patrick is a mentor and friend, from whom I have learnt the vital skill of disciplined critical thinking. His forensic scrutiny of my technical writing has been invaluable. He has always found the time to propose consistently excellent improvements. I owe a great debt of gratitude to Phil and Patrick.

I would like to thank Professor Greg Michaelson for offering thorough and excellent feedback on an earlier version of this thesis. In addition, a thank you to Dr Gudmund Grov. Gudmund gave feedback on Chapter 4 of this thesis, and suggested generality improvements to my model checking abstraction of HdpH-RS.

A special mention for Dr Edsko de Vries of Well Typed, for our insightful and detailed discussions about network transport design. Furthermore, Edsko engineered the network abstraction layer on which the fault detecting component of HdpH-RS is built.

I thank the computing officers at Heriot-Watt University and the Edinburgh Parallel Computing Centre for their support and hardware access for the performance evaluation of HdpH-RS.

Contributor: Rob Stewart

Source: Stewart, R (2013) Reliable Massively Parallel Symbolic Computing: Fault Tolerance for a Distributed Haskell, PhD, Heriot Watt University

Making me realise that I should never let being dyslexic hold me back from what I want to do

This PhD thesis is the culmination of a life-long interest in geology and has turned into as much a labour of love as a scientific study. Numerous people over the years have helped me get here, so there are many people I need to thank. Firstly, I would like to thank my supervisors from Durham University, Richard Davies and Richard Brown for their support, encouragement and advice throughout this project. I would like to thank my supervisors from Statoil UK Ltd, Jenny Morris and Rosie Fletcher for their guidance and assistance, and for giving me valuable insights into the petroleum industry. I would also like to thank my past supervisors, Dougal Jerram and Dorthe Møller Hansen for helping to set up this project. I am very grateful to the Volcanic Margins Research Consortium for providing excellent field trips, a place to discuss my research and access to some of the most knowledgeable people in my field, both in academia and industry. I would especially like to thank Tim Watton, Sam Clark, Bansri Raithatha, Heather Rawcliffe, Catherine Nelson, Clayton Grove, Nick Schofield, Simon Passey, David Brown, Richard Walker and Brian Bell for interesting discussions, both in the class room and down the pub. At the end of my PhD, this thesis was examined by Peter Burgess from Royal Holloway, University of London and Claire Horwell from Durham University. I would like to thank both of them for the many suggestions that improved this manuscript.

I would like to extend my gratitude to Statoil UK for funding this project through the CeREES scholarship program, and for providing much of the seismic reflection data. To David Ellis, Peter Dromgoole, Alex Reid and Adam Pugh for useful discussions and advice throughout my PhD. To DONG Energy UK for providing an internship and for letting me get my hands on industry data without any real expectations. To Mike Smith, Steve Cannon, Catherine Horseman, Alwyn Ross, Rémi Rateau, Giuseppina Pezza and Richard Nice for letting me ask many, many questions about Petrel. To the Rosebank partnership, Chevron, Statoil, OMV and DONG Energy, for permission to use the work undertaken during my internship as part of my PhD thesis. To Chevron, CGG Veritas, Fugro Multi Client Services, PGS, Spectrum ASA and WesternGeco for providing the seismic data under licence from Statoil UK Ltd and DONG Energy UK. To Halliburton for providing the seismic interpretation software through the Landmark Universities software grant program and Schlumberger for providing Petrel under licence to DONG Energy UK.

From Durham University, I am grateful to all the administrative staff for practical support throughout my PhD, including Katie Daniels, Andrea Bailey, Karen Atkinson, Janice Oakes, Paula Elliot and April Furnal. I would also like to thank members of the academic staff for advice and support, including João Trabucho-Alexandre, Jon Gluyas and Chris Greenwell. In addition, I would like to thank Dave Stevenson and Gary Wilkinson for data loading, software and hardware support. I would like to thank my fellow postgraduate students for providing a sense of community and camaraderie, there are too many of you to mention but I would especially like to thank Claire McLeod, Isobel Yeo, Harriet Ridley and Amy Clarke. I would also like to thank Mark Ireland, Steve Richardson, Katie Roberts, Amélie Leduc, Dom Maloney and David Moy for helping me get to grips with my research and the more technical elements of interpreting seismic reflection data. Many thanks to the Durham Volcanology Group for providing interesting discussions and introducing me to other aspects of volcanology. Going back in time, I want to thank my classmates and lecturers from the Geology Department at University of Leicester who helped me to believe in myself, made learning a fun experience and who provided me with a strong foundation in the subject I love. I am also grateful to Paul Starr and Paul Edmunds who taught ‘A’ level geology at Bishop Stopford School, Kettering. You set me on the path I am on now and I have never looked back.

On a more personal note I would like to thank Emily Boon, Karen Bianchi, Kathy Mather and Jo Variava for never letting me doubt myself and for reminding me there is a whole world outside of my PhD. I would especially like to thank Rhian Meara for toblerone martinis, peanut butter M&M’s and for always being there when I needed her. I would also like to thank Helen and Mike Hedley for their support and for always inviting me to take a break and go away with them to play in the snow. I am eternally gratefully to my family, my parents Helen and Michael, my siblings Tom and Fiona, my Grandmother, the American and Canadian contingents and those family members more recently rediscovered. Thank you for encouraging me, supporting me and making me realise that I should never let being dyslexic hold me back from what I want to do. This PhD is a testament to your faith in me, I hope I have made you proud. Finally I would like to thank my long suffering other half Ben Hedley. Words cannot express my gratitude for everything you have done. Thank you for accompanying me on this adventure, I look forward to our next one!!

Contributor: Kirstie Wright

Source: Wright, K (2013) Seismic Stratigraphy and Geomorphology of Palaeocene Volcanic Rocks, Faroe-Shetland Basin, PhD, Durham University

…my parents for everything. You made me into who I am.

Although writing up the PhD thesis might be the effort of one person, the reason that person even gets as far as starting to write up is thanks to all the people supporting that PhD student. I am grateful for everyone who has been there to support my journey towards the finished thesis. I’m indebted to and grateful for the following persons…

… my main supervisor Stefan Holmlid, for all the support and letting me find my own path whilst at the same time showing me which alternate paths I might be missing. Never forcing, always suggesting suits me perfectly!

… my two co-supervisors Arne Jönsson and Björn Alm. Both of you have provided invaluable outsiders perspectives on my research when most needed. Björn, a special thank you for all the fruitful discussions in general and on the methodological approach in general. And to Arne, thank you for your experience and making sure the research continued to progress towards a finished thesis.

… everyone who has participated in my studies. I am extremely grateful for all your help. In total roughly 50 people have been involved in one way or another in providing the data used in the studies. This thesis would not have been possible to write without your help. An extra warm thank you to everyone in the three agencies I worked in/with for the final study for allowing me to be a part of your work places.

… HCS for providing an enjoyable place to work in. And special thanks to IxS and the fika-crowd. IxS for providing an intellectually inspiring  environment to work in, in which there always are new perspectives to be found when needed – thank you Stefan, Johan, Matti, Johan, Lisa, Eva, Mathias and Tim. And to the fika-crowd for providing many laughs, exciting discussions and a few beers during my PhD studies. So a big thank you to all of you; those of you who were here when I started and now have moved on (Sanna, Maria and Sara), those who have been here throughout most of my PhD (Johan, Amy, Jody and Anna) and all of you have joined the last few years (Lisa, Jonas R, Mattias, Kricke, Falkenskägg, Robin, Tim, Camilla and Karin). Also, thanks to all the administrative staff, especially Lise-Lott and Anne.

… an extra thank you to Johan and Lisa, the ones I tend to turn to first when I have something to discuss. Or just need a break.

… all the photo models. For the cover I want to thank the Zodiaken-staff in general for allowing me to take the photos on the front and back of the thesis cover, and Kristofer Frendesson in particular for getting in front of the camera. Similarly, my thanks go to the “customers” Matti, Lisa, Johan, Amy, Stefan and Tim. Furthermore, many thanks go to Jalal Maleki for taking the photos at Zodiaken. For the examples of visualisation techniques, my thanks go to Anna for modelling and Jonas H for photographing.

… my parents for everything. You made me into who I am.

Research support: The research presented in this thesis has been supported by: Vinnova: SERV project: Service Design, innovation and involvement. Ref no: 2007-03444. European Union: CIP Competitiveness and Innovation Program, research project “Service Design as an approach to foster competitiveness and sustainability of European tourism”.

Contributor: Fabian Segelström

Source: Segelström F (2013) Stakeholder Engagement for Service Design: How service designers identify and communicate insights, PhD, Linköping University

Thank you for being my muse, editor, proofreader, and sounding board

Carrying out the requisite work and then writing this thesis was, undoubtably, the most arduous task I have undertaken. However, one of the joys of having completed the thesis is looking back at everyone who has helped me over the past three, seven, and twenty-five years.

I would like to begin by thanking my three supervisors: Professors Sasha Movchan, Ian Jones, and Natasha Movchan. It is an often used cliché, but in this case it is no overstatement to say that without the consistent guidance, tutelage, support, unparalleled knowledge, and encouragement of my three supervisors, this thesis would never have existed. In particular, I would like to thank Natasha who went above and beyond to read every line of the manuscript in meticulous detail. I must say a special thank you to Sasha and Ian who, during my third year as an undergraduate, whetted my appetite for research and gave me the opportunity to study mathematics further.

Thank you also to Will Daniels and Serco Assurance for piquing my interest in industrial mathematics and providing me with such an interesting project to study during my third year as an undergraduate.

I would also like to thank the co-authors of my papers: Dr Mike Nieves for his encouragement, support and guidance; Dr Michele Brun for his hard-work, willingness to help, and knowledge, but mostly for his sense of humour; and Professor Ross McPhedran for his unsurpassed experience and knowledge of Mathematical Physics.

I should also like to thank fellow graduate student Stewart Haslinger, and indeed all the graduate students at the Department of Mathematical Sciences, primarily for giving me someone to moan at when work wasn’t progressing according to plan.

To my family, particularly my parents and sister, thank you for your love, support, and unwavering belief in me. Without you, I would not be the person I am today.

Above all I would like to thank my wife Nicola for her love and constant support, for all the late nights and early mornings, and for keeping me sane over the past few months. Thank you for being my muse, editor, proofreader, and sounding board. But most of all, thank you for being my best friend. I owe you everything.

Finally, despite my love for mathematics, the work reported in this thesis would not have been possible without the financial support of an EPSRC studentship (EP/H018514/1), for which I am grateful.

Contributor: @DanielColquitt

Source: Colquitt, D J (2013) Mathematical modelling of the dyamic response of metamaterial structures, PhD, Liverpool University

Thanks to all those on #phdchat…for the enormous help, moral support, motivation and kindness

To describe this as a journey is an understatement. It has been hard work, ridiculously difficult at times, but extremely rewarding, and I am surprised and amazed to have made it to this point. I have a number of people to thank for their support in getting this far on this doctoral journey.

First, thanks very much to my supervisor Ron Thompson, for his constant support, advice, calmness and tenacity over the last five years, and also to Roger Crawford my second supervisor for his advice on my draft thesis, and a big thanks to all the tutors who generously gave up their time for me to interview them.

Next on the list, a massive thank you to my husband, Duncan, and my lovely children, Nicola, Sam, and Lauren for all their love and support, for putting up with my moods and grumpiness at times, and for allowing me time away from family stuff to get this thing completed, and to you this thesis is dedicated. I am also forever indebted to my mum and dad for all they sacrificed for us, and thanks also to my lovely brothers: Dave and Pete; and sisters: Janet and Debbie, who are so supportive in whatever I do in my life.

A huge thank you to two very special colleagues: Cath Ellis, for believing in me and giving me the confidence to start on and continue on this doctoral journey; and to Liz Bennett, who I have been lucky enough to have had travelling this same journey alongside me, and whose constant support, practical advice and optimism has helped to keep me going, and dragged me to the finish line. I’d also like to thank Cheryl Reynolds and David Powell for all their support along the way.

Finally thanks to all those on #phdchat on Twitter, too many to name individually, for the enormous help, moral support, motivation and kindness. Phdchat is a great example of the affordances of social media, providing a personal learning network of doctoral students worldwide supporting and collaborating together.

Contributor: @SueFolley

Source: Folley, S (2013) Bridging the gap between face-to-face and online teaching: a case study exploring tutors’ early experiences of teaching online in a UK university 2009-2012. Doctoral thesis, University of Huddersfield

The biggest of all the giants is my Dad

Standing on the shoulders of giants…

Back in 2009, I remember discussing my initial attempt at a literature review with Sal Craig when he asked me, ‘Who are your giants? Whose shoulders are you going to stand on?’. To paraphrase Newton if I have seen any further, it is by standing on the shoulders of my giants, of whom there are several. To them all, I am extremely grateful to for your help, support and encouragement over the last four years.

To my industrial giants Buro Happold, thank you for the generous sponsorship. Thank you to all those I worked with over the last four years throughout my engineering doctorate (EngD). To Lindsey, Christine and Celia for having the patience to read my work. Special thanks have to go Sal and Neil for their advice in the earlier years of the research. Thanks to Zack for all he taught me while completing his own EngD. Mark, thank you for helping me through all the EngD modules and accompanying me on this journey. And to Jonathan, a huge thank you for all the proof reading, cups of tea and the friendship extended to me since the day I started back in 2008.

In the academic world I wish to thank the ESPRC for funding the EngD programme, which I was fortunate to be a part of. Thank you to Eleanor Van Den Heuvel and Linda Paul at Brunel University for helping me coordinate the participants and usability studies. I’d also like to thank all of the study participants who gave up their time to help me, without whom this research would not have been possible.

Within the school of Engineering and Design, Brunel University, I’d like to thank Dr Hua Dong for her invaluable advice throughout the doctorate. Dr Mark Young thank you for the statistical help and advice on study design. Dan Lockton, thank you for pointing me in the right direction and for continuing to encourage me throughout. Your work has been an inspiration as to what research work can achieve. Professor David Harrison, thank you for providing me with the opportunity to undertake the EngD in the first place and for your continued support and reassurance over the years.

The biggest of all the giants is my Dad, who I cannot thank enough for the opportunities he has given me, the constant encouragement he provides and for always being there for me. I am so fortunate to have a champion like you, who is supportive and motivating in equal measures. Alongside my Dad there is Catherine, my sister Emma and the rest of my family in South Africa, thank you for being in my life.

To my friends Julia, Anna, Kat, Anna, and Sarah – thank you for your continued friendship, support, hugs, skype chats, laughs and cups of tea along the way. David, thank you for taking the time to proof read this thesis, your input was invaluable. Thank you Ferg, for all the conversations, philosophical debates and inspirational conversations over coffee and cake. I am truly lucky to count you amongst my friends. And Tim, thank you for all the support and encouragement you give me, and the patience and unwavering faith you have in me. You believe in me even when I don’t believe in myself. For that I am eternally grateful. Love, always.

I would like to dedicate this thesis to the memory of my mother, Jenny Combe (1948-1994), who is a constant source of inspiration. I hope she would have been proud.

Contributor: @niccombe

Source: EngD, Brunel University, 2012

 

I am very grateful to all those who have given me their friendship, put up with my odd hours, and provided me with lifts and practical help

My thanks are due first to my Director of Studies, Dr Martin Polley, of the School of Education, University of Southampton (formerly of King Alfred’s College of Higher Education, Winchester), and my Second Supervisor, Professor Joyce Goodman, of University College, Winchester, for their guidance, encouragement and enthusiasm for my project over the years. My thanks are also directed at my Academic Advisor, Dr Terence Rodgers, of Bath Spa University College, for advice and comments on particular aspects of the thesis, and to Professor Roger Richardson, University College, Winchester, for his initial help and supervision of the project. I am grateful to Dr Malcolm Smith, of the University of Wales, Lampeter, and Dr Chris Aldous, of University College, Winchester, for their examining input at the upgrade stage.

University College, Winchester also provided a lively research community and I am grateful to other staff and postgraduates for their support and ideas, in particular Dr Stephanie Spencer for allowing me to practise verbally expounding my ideas. King Alfred’s generously funded the initial three years of study, and has subsequently funded attendance at conferences, giving me further opportunities to present my work and discuss issues with established historians. It also funded participation at workshops, including those concerning the digitisation of historical resources. The library, in particular Miranda Nield-Dumper, patiently ordered many inter-library loans, and the ITCS Department ensured that my computer remained in working order, whilst Ian Short (software developer) and Lynne Frost (née Biltcliffe) (IT Trainer) also provided help with the initial development of the project database. I am exceptionally grateful to Dr James Heather, University of Surrey at Guildford, who has spent many hours developing the project database to my requirements, even whilst completing his own PhD.

An extensive amount of time has been spent in archives and record offices, and I thank all the staff for the help and advice given, particularly the following: Michael Moody at the Imperial War Museum; Anna Green and Joy Eldridge of the Mass-Observation Archives; Katrina Royall and others at the Victoria & Albert Museum; the Public Record Office; the British Library, in particular The British Library Newspaper Library, Colindale; Churchill Archives Centre, Cambridge; the London Transport Museum; the House of Lords Record Office; the Wellcome Institute and the Women’s Library.

I am also indebted to other libraries that allowed me to use their facilities in the course of my research, in particular Winchester School of Art Library, the Hartley Library, University of Southampton; the Institute for Historical Research; St. Peter’s Library, University of Brighton; Templeman Library, University of Kent at Canterbury, and the library at the University of Sussex. I am very appreciative of University College, Winchester who allowed me to attend the ‘Research Methodology’ module from ‘MA in Regional and Local History and Archaeology’, and Winchester School of Art, who allowed me to attend selected lectures from ‘MA: Art and Ideology in Europe 1917-1968’, both free of charge. I also appreciate the University of Kent at Canterbury, who allowed me to attend selected lectures from their ‘MA in Propaganda, Persuasion and History’. I am very grateful to all those who have written to me, particularly those who completed my questionnaire in 1997 and 1998, from which I received much useful information.

Personally, I would like to thank my family and friends for supporting me throughout the years, financially, practically and with moral support, especially my parents. I am exceptionally grateful to Andrew Frost for providing me with a room at a rate that I could afford to stay in Winchester for a key time. Particular thanks goes to Toby and Nicky Robinson and Justin Wood for providing me with places to stay whilst conducting extensive research in London, and to Dr Justine Cooper, who alongside such practical help, provided beneficial advice arising from her previous experience as a Winchester PhD student. Kate Stephens gave me exceptional moral support, Karen Neal allowed me to practise explaining my thesis, David and Chris Quayle were supportive landlords during the final months of writing, and there are many more whom I could name, including Amanda Henocq and Helen Hobbs, but the list would be absurdly long. I am very grateful to all those who have given me their friendship, put up with my odd hours, and provided me with lifts and practical help.

Contributor: @ww2poster

Source: Lewis, B (2004) The Planning, Design and Reception of British Home Front Propaganda Posters of the Second World War, PhD, University College Winchester

…to Chris, for not letting me not do it, and for understanding and being wonderful

Dedication

This thesis is dedicated to the memory of my Mum, Pavla Marie Atherton, to whom I never really got to explain much of this, but who approved. She would have been tickled to see me wearing a mortarboard.

Acknowledgements

I would like to thank my supervisors,

Dr Charles Leek (University of Wales, Bangor), Dr Neil Thacker (University of Manchester), and Professor Alan Jackson (University of Manchester)

for their kind help and endless patience, and also for just letting me get on with it. I am particularly indebted to Charles for his helpful suggestions and unfailing geniality.

I would like to express my profound gratitude to Dr Guillaume Thierry (University of Wales, Bangor), for his tireless assistance with the ERP study, which was very much appreciated.

Thanks are also due to the following people, without whose patient technical assistance I would not have been able to complete the work presented here:

Mark Roberts (University of Wales, Bangor) Dr Shane McKie (University of Manchester) Yvon Watson (University of Manchester) Dr Igor Hollander (formerly of the University of Manchester)

I would also like to thank Professor Neil Roberts (University of Liverpool) and Dr Rob Ward (University of Wales, Bangor) for their helpful comments and suggestions for improvements to this thesis.

Last, and most importantly, love and thanks to my parents, Pavla and Graham, for believing I could do it, and to Chris, for not letting me not do it, and for understanding and being wonderful.

Contributor: @finiteattention
Source: Atherton, C (2005) The Neurobiology of Object Constancy, PhD, University of Wales, Bangor

…who believed in me and my ability and encouraged me to be the best that I could be

This is one of the hardest parts of my thesis to write as there are so many people I need to thank. I shall start by getting the money issue out of the way first. This research was funded in part by my parents and also through an ESRC/NERC studentship (PTA-036-2005-00005). I was also lucky enough to obtain grants from the Central London Research Fund and the KCL SSSPP small grants fund for the construction of my research web-site. I thank my supervisors Professor David Demeritt and Dr. Debby Potts for their intellectual guidance, time and patience and Lester Jones for drawing the maps included within this thesis. I wish to thank all those who participated in my research, I am extremely grateful to you all for your time. I would like to pay special thanks to Dr. David Duthie from UNEP for opening up a number of doors for me within the world of biosafety as well as Alex Owuso-Biney from UNEP and John Komen from PBS.

A few years back the teacher training agency ran an ad campaign entitled everyone remembers a good teacher. With that in mind I dedicate this thesis to Mrs Gill Marels, the person responsible for my love of Geography and who believed in me and my ability and encouraged me to be the best that I could be, thank you. I feel at this point it is essential for me to also pay special thanks to Dr Allan Potts and Dr Julian Saurin from Sussex University for their support, encouragement and persuasive reference writing.

I must also thank my friends for being there and supporting me with friendly advice, cups of tea and random conversations about what is wrong with the world particularly, Dr. Lowell Woodcock who has been a great friend, sounding board and general finder of random literature since day one.  Thanks also go to Dr. James Fraser for returning from Columbia at just the right time to help me put my thesis together. To Leanne Brazzell for getting me out of the house occasionally and making sure i ate properly and Clare Rogers and Jo Dickinson for their continued support and friendship over the years, not forgetting their ability to find the correct document the first time you asked whilst always smiling.  My dancing buddies Celeste Korfker, Dr. Rachel Miller and Saskia de Jong as well as my fabulous dance teachers, who should be showered with praise for what they have done for my self-confidence; Hanna Haarala, Karen Hardy and Erin Boag. Other people know them as ‘Strictly pros’ i am lucky enough to class them as my friends.

My final thanks are reserved for my parents, Ann and Howard Quinnell and my family who have been a continual source of support both financial and emotional, strength and motivation and for that I am forever grateful.

Contributor: @sarahthesheepu
Source: Quinnell, S-L (2010) Building Capacity for Biosafety in Africa: Networks of Science, Aid & Development in MEA Implementation, PhD, Department of Geography – King’s College London